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 AKC Board Minutes,Chairman's Report

AKC Board Meeting Minutes

Meeting held February 9th-10th, 2017

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To search for specific subject, person, or word in the American Kennel Club minutes, use "find" command. Wording is exactly as presented in the Minutes provided by American Kennel Club Secretary James Crowley, with addition of bolded subject text.


The Board convened on Thursday February 9, 2017 at 8:00 a.m. All Directors were present, except for Ms. McAteer, whose flight was cancelled due to weather. She participated in a portion of the meeting by telephone conference. Also present were the Executive Secretary, the Assistant Executive Secretary, the Senior Executive Vice President and General Counsel, as well as the Executive Vice President and Chief Growth Officer.

 

The January 2017 Board minutes, copies of which were made available to all Directors, were discussed. Upon a motion by Dr. Battaglia, seconded by Dr. Davies, the January 2017 minutes were unanimously approved; absent Ms. McAteer.

 

EXECUTIVE SESSION There was an Executive Session to discuss Real Estate issues in the New York City area as AKC proceeds towards the end of its current lease. This will be an ongoing process.

 

PRESIDENT’S REPORT - Board Action Items Mr. Sprung reviewed Action Items, and reported on staff initiatives.

 

Legal Status Report Ms. McManus, Deputy General Counsel, presented a status report on pending litigation and other Legal activities for the month of January 2017.

 

Chief Veterinary Officer Dr. Jerry Klein, AKC’s Chief Veterinary Officer, addressed the Board. There was a discussion on the AVMA’s recently adopted position on breeding and genetic disorders. Dr. Klein outlined the successful effort by AKC to have its input considered in the version of the position adopted. He emphasized the need for AKC to engage in bridge building with the AVMA.

     Dr. Klein outlined his recent activities on behalf of AKC. They included vet school visits and work to modify the AVMA statement on breeding and genetic disorders. Dr. Klein’s plans to attend the AVMA’s annual conference in Indianapolis. He also stressed the need for AKC to emphasize the importance of sanitation when examining dogs’ mouths in the judging ring to prevent the spread of diseases. If a judge examines the mouth, his/her hands must be sanitized after examining each dog and before examining the next one.

     Dr. Klein suggested that AKC review the current age restriction for breeding in the Rules Applying to Registration and Discipline, to determine if they should be revised.

 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY - Dachshund Proposed Breed Standard Revision The Board reviewed the proposed revisions to the Color and Disqualification sections of the Smooth Dachshund breed standard as submitted by the Dachshund Club of America (DCA). The current standard was approved by the AKC Board on January 9, 2007. Following a motion by Mr. Ashby, seconded by Mr. Arnold, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent Ms. McAteer) to approve the proposed breed standard revision, for publication on the Secretary’s Page for comment.

 

Chinook Stud Book The Board reviewed a request from the Chinook Club of America to keep the Stud Book open for the breed. The Chinook Stud Book is scheduled to close January 1, 2018. Currently, AKC will accept dogs registered with United Kennel Club. The breed is not recognized in Canada or with FCI. The Chinook became an AKC-recognized breed effective January 1, 2013. Since recognition, 64 unique dogs have competed in AKC events earning 105 titles, 9 conformation titles and the rest have been companion event titles. Following a motion by Dr. Garvin, seconded by Mr. Ashby the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent Ms. McAteer) to keep the Chinook Stud Book open for five additional years until January 1, 2023.

 

Delegate Parent Club Committee Mentors for New Breed Clubs The AKC Board recommended the utilization of the Parent Club Delegate Committee to act as mentors for new Parent Clubs seeking recognition and AKC Club Membership status. A Parent Club Delegate Subcommittee was formed for this purpose.

     The Parent Club Subcommittee submitted the following Mission Statement:

          Mission Statement

          The Subcommittee on Non-Member Parent Clubs is committed to working with non– AKC member Parent Clubs to facilitate their pathway to full AKC Member Club status.

          Goal

          All non–AKC member recognized Parent Clubs seeking Member Club status are assisted by the Subcommittee on Non-Member Parent Clubs on the pathway to AKC Member Club recognition.

          Process

          Working cooperatively with the Sport Services and Club Relations departments, the members of the above Subcommittee will:

          Establish contact with appropriate representatives of the non–AKC member recognized Parent Clubs representing the breeds approved for the Miscellaneous Classes and additional Parent Clubs that are committed to becoming so recognized;

          By use of mentoring and self-study tools, provide assistance to these clubs as required through assessment of supporting documentation, meetings, referral, and consultation with designated AKC staff;

          Seek to streamline the procedure through avoiding duplication, promoting efficient use of resources and establishing reasonable timelines, and assisting the non–AKC member clubs as appropriate and necessary along the pathway to full recognition as AKC Member Clubs.

     Following a motion by Mr. Kalter, seconded by Ms. Ashby, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent Ms. McAteer) to approve the Mission Statement as submitted by the Parent Club Subcommittee.

 

Request that a Rule Change Go Forward The AKC staff unanimously recommended that the proposed amendment to Chapter 11, Section 8A, of the Rules Applying to Dog Shows, concerning the requirements for reinstatement of a dog disqualified under the provisions of Chapter 11, Section 8A, not be approved. It was unanimously disapproved by the Board, but the Dog Show Rules Committee, which proposed the amendment, is requesting that it go forward to the Delegates for a vote. The Committee is requesting that this be read in June, rather than March, for a vote in September, where there will be a larger attendance than June. Following a motion by Mr. Ashby, seconded by Mr. Dok, the FINAL Pg. 3 February 9-10, 2017 Board VOTED (unanimously; absent Ms. McAteer) to read the amendment at the June 2017 meeting, as requested by the Delegate Dog Show Rules Committee.

 

Black & Tan Coonhounds Stud Book The Board reviewed a request from the American Black & Tan Coonhound Club to keep the Stud Book Open for the breed. The Black & Tan Coonhound Stud Book is scheduled to close May 31, 2017. Currently, AKC will accept dogs registered with United Kennel Club and they must be Purple Ribbon dogs. This will be discussed further at the April meeting.

 

Communications and Public Relations Q4 and Year End Reports The Board reviewed the AKC Communications department’s media coverage totals and activities highlights for the 4th quarter and for 2016 in total.

 

2016 YEAR-END MEDIA COVERAGE ANALYSIS Total media placements (print, broadcast and internet) qualitatively evaluated in 2016:

Q1- 10,142     Q2- 3,552     Q3- 2,926     Q4- 7,354

Total number of clips evaluated for 2016 was 23,974

Total audience reached with all clips (including print, online, TV, syndicated and matte stories):

Q1- 7,745,013,047     Q2- 15,900,434,375     Q3- 11,334,718,354     Q4- 13,743,339,429

Total audience reached for 2016 was 48,723,505,205

Total publicity value achieved through media placements (print, broadcast and internet) qualitatively evaluated in 2016:

Q1- $804,049,789.70     Q2- $1,967,678,753.91     Q3- $1,402,671,396.31     Q4- $1,700,738,254.33

Total publicity value for 2016 was $5,875,138,194.25

 

GR Legislative Update and Year in Review The Board reviewed a Government Relations (GR) department memo that provided a year in review summary for the year 2016 and a status update on current department activity, major projects, significant legislative issues and accomplishments.

     In 2016, the GR team monitored more than 2,200 federal, state and local bills impacting responsible dog ownership and dog owners. The team responded with alerts, analysis, written and in-person testimony, policy recommendations and proposed amendments as appropriate. GR also continued to develop new and expanded educational and policy resources for the public, clubs and other advocates.

     Legislative measures monitored along with response and engagement activity reached a new record in 2016, bypassing the previous high of 1,700 in 2015. The vast majority of problematic measures monitored were not passed into law. Most of the measures tracked in 2016 were state-level proposals; however, there continues to be an increase in the number and variety of anti-breeder measures introduced at the local level, a trend we expect to continue in 2017. GR also monitored approximately 900 state and federal regulatory changes, with analysis, official comments and responses, to approximately 45 sets of regulations. The sheer volume of proposals demonstrates that animal issues continue to be a hot topic with the public and policymakers.

     In July, GR conducted its most successful AKC national legislative conference yet, in Raleigh, North Carolina. Some 75 federation leaders and legislative liaisons attended. Attendees traveled from as far as Hawaii to participate in the “by invitation only” two-day conference. Legislative/Educational/Lobby days were held in the following states in conjunction with local breeders, federations and clubs/enthusiasts: North Carolina, New Jersey, Iowa, Colorado, Georgia, Connecticut, Tennessee, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, California and Wisconsin. The Board approved for the 2017 budget an increase to the size of the Government Relations department. The filling of these new positions is on-going. This reflects the Board’s view of the importance of the AKC Government Relations in advancing the mission of the American Kennel Club.

 

COMPLIANCE Heather McManus, Deputy General Counsel, and Michael Liosis, Director of Compliance, participated in this portion of the meeting. Marcus Bach, Director, Investigations and Inspections, and Wanda Forlines, Manager of Compliance, participated by teleconference.

     Inspections Status Report for 2016 The Board reviewed the Compliance Department’s Inspections Status Report for the year 2016. The total number of locations inspected in 2016 was 2,890, which is 18.7% higher than the total number of locations inspected in 2015.

 

CONSENT A motion by Mr. Ashby, seconded by Kalter, and following discussion, it was VOTED unanimously to approve the following Consent Items:

 

AKC Scent Work - A New Sport The Board VOTED to approve a new sport called AKC Scent Work. Scent Work is a sport that mimics the task of working detection dogs to locate a scent and communicate to the handler that the scent has been found. This proposal responds to many requests that the American Kennel Club provide such an event. Significant research has been done in developing this program and it is believed it will meet the needs of many dog owners.

     Scent Work is a sport in which a dog-handler team must locate hidden scents within a defined search area. The dog uses their sense of smell to locate the target odor, which may be an essential oil or the scent of the handler. Any team who finds and calls all hidden odors within the designated time will qualify. Scent Work is a pass/fail sport, however placements will be awarded for the first through fourth place teams, based on fewest number of faults and then on time. Titles are earned when teams reach a certain number of qualifying legs. The event will be open to all breeds and Canine Partners. Dogs must be registered/listed with the AKC. Scent Work is a fun and engaging activity that taps into the dog’s strongest sense.

     Clubs may start applying to hold AKC Scent Work events on August 1, 2017. Events may be held starting October 1, 2017.

 

New Trick Dog Program The Board VOTED to approve a recommendation to develop an AKC Trick Dog titling program. There will be four levels of titles - Novice, Intermediate, Advanced and Performer Trick Dogs. The performance of a dog attempting to earn its Trick Dog title will be certified by CGC evaluators. In addition, titles earned through the “Do More with Your Dog” (DMWYD) Trick Dog organization will be acknowledged by the AKC at the request of the owner. The program will launch on May 1, 2017.

 

Herding – Allowing Juniors to Handle a Dog in a Lower Level Class - The Board VOTED to approve changes to Chapter 4, Sections 1 and 4, of the Herding Regulations, to allow juniors to handle a dog in a lower level herding class even if the dog has acquired a qualifying score at a higher level. In that case the dog would not be eligible for High in Trial or Reserve High in Trial. This change is an effort to promote junior participation in the herding program. (Changes Underlined)

 

Chapter 4. Section 1. Trial Levels. The regular levels at a Herding trial shall be Started, Intermediate and Advanced. An owner may enter a dog in any trial level he or she deems appropriate; however, once that dog has acquired a qualifying score in such level at a licensed or member trial, it shall be ineligible to be entered in any lower level (on that course/stock). Except a junior handler may handle a dog in a lower level even if the dog has acquired a qualifying score or a title at a higher level. In this case the dog is not eligible for High In Trial or Reserve HIT. Trial secretaries are asked to indicate on the result forms when a dog is handled by a junior. If the dog has not earned a title at the lower level, a title certificate will be issued once the necessary number of qualifying scores have been acquired. If the dog has previously earned a title at the lower level, no further title certificates will be issued. The remaining paragraph in this section is unchanged.

 

Chapter 4. Section 4. Herding Champion. Fourth paragraph. When a dog from an Advanced class goes High In Trial, one Championship point is earned if there is only one dog in the Advanced classes, and two Championship points are earned by the highest scoring dog when there are two dogs in the Advanced classes. Note: A dog that has earned a qualifying score or a title at a higher level and is being handled by a Junior in a lower level class is not eligible for High In Trial or Reserve HIT.

 

These changes will become effective March 1, 2017.

 

Rally Program Enhancements The Board VOTED to create two additional Rally classes – the Intermediate class and the Master class. In terms of difficulty, the Intermediate class is between the current Novice and Advanced classes. The Master class will be more difficult than the Excellent class. There will be titles associated with these new classes. In addition, a Rally Championship prefix title (RACH) is recommended for dogs that achieve a given number of triple Qs (qualify in the Advanced, Excellent and Master class at the same trial) plus earn a given number of points from the Master class. Clubs may start to apply for events with these new classes on August 1, 2017 for events held on or after November 1, 2017. (Changes Underlined)

 

Chapter 1 Section 1. Application to Hold a Rally Trial. (Paragraph 3) A licensed or member rally trial need not include all the regular rally classes, but a club will not be approved to hold the Intermediate class unless it also holds Novice classes. Likewise, it will not be approved to hold Advanced classes unless it also holds Novice and Intermediate classes. Nor will it be approved to hold Excellent classes unless it also holds Novice, Intermediate and Advanced classes; and it will not be approved to hold the Masters class unless it also holds Novice, Intermediate, Advanced and Excellent classes. Any club that has been approved to hold a licensed or member rally trial may offer additional non-regular classes upon AKC approval. If a non-regular class is one that is not defined in these regulations, a clear and complete description of both the eligibility and performance requirements will appear in the premium list.

 

Section 20. Judging Program.  To facilitate a more efficient trial, it is strongly recommended that clubs assign the A and B classes of the same title level to the same judge. The order in which the classes are scheduled each day may vary, e.g. Master, Excellent, Advanced, Intermediate, then Novice; or Novice, Intermediate, Advanced, Excellent, then Master. After entries have closed, any club holding a licensed or member rally trial must prepare a program. The judging program must list the start time for each class scheduled to start before 12:00 noon. The listed start time for each class is the time of the walkthrough and judging of the class will follow. An additional 10 minutes must be added into the first hour of judging for the first walkthrough. Classes scheduled to start at, or after 12:00 noon will be listed to start “after noon” and must be judged in the order and ring listed in the judging program. If the published judge and ring are available prior to the listed start time and all exhibitors have checked-in and agree, the judge may start a class earlier than the class time listed in the judging program.

 

Section 22. Limitation of Entries. (Beginning at Paragraph 3) When entries are limited, a club must designate an RAE and a Rally Champion (RACH) class in the premium list. Dogs entered in this RAE class would be entered in both Advanced B and Excellent B, and the combined entry fee for these two classes must be paid. If due to entry limits an exhibitor cannot be entered in both the Advanced B and Excellent B classes the RAE class will be considered closed and any subsequent entries for this class will be unacceptable in their entirety.

     Dogs entered in the RACH class would be entered in Advanced B, Excellent B and the Master class. The combined entry fee for these three classes must be paid. If due to entry limits an exhibitor cannot be entered in the Advanced B, Excellent B and Master classes the RACH class will be considered closed and any subsequent entries for this class will be unacceptable in their entirety.

     However, a club at its discretion, may choose to establish a wait list in order to fill openings created by entries that are withdrawn prior to the event closing day. If a club is maintaining a wait list, this shall be stated in the premium. The full entry fee shall be refunded to an entrant whose entry is replaced by a wait-listed entry.

 

Chapter 2 Section 16. Heel Position. The dog is at the handler’s left side, facing the same direction the handler is facing; the dog’s body is within the area of the handler’s left hip; and the dog should be close to, but not crowding its handler so that the handler has freedom of motion at all times.

Section 17. Commands. Section 18. Orders and Minimum Penalties Section 19. Misbehavior. Section 20. Training and Warm-up on the Grounds. Section 21. Disciplining in the Ring. Section 22. Abuse of Dogs. Section 23. Declining Entries.

 

Chapter 3 Section 7. Qualifying Scores and General Scoring. Minor to Substantial Deduction (1-10 points) for each of the following:

• Repeat of a station -- only one (1) retry of each station will be allowed for all class levels, except there are no retries in the Rally Master class.  Repeat of a station is an automatic 3-point deduction

 

Section 10. Rally Ribbons. At licensed or member rally trials, the following colors must be used for prize ribbons or rosettes in all regular classes:

 

First Prize – Blue

Second Prize – Red

Third Prize – Yellow

Fourth Prize – White

Qualifying Prize – Dark Green

 

Highest Combined score in Advanced B and Excellent B award ribbon or rosette shall be Blue and Green.

 

Section 12. Highest Combined Score in the Advanced B and Excellent B Classes. The dog receiving the highest combined score in Advanced B and Excellent B will be awarded the ribbon and any prizes offered for this placement after the Advanced B and Excellent B classes have been judged and after the announcement of those final scores. The superintendent or show or trial secretary will mark the catalog with an (HC) to identify the dog receiving this award.

 

Section 13. Highest Scoring Triple Qualifying Score. The dog receiving the highest combined score in Advanced B, Excellent B and Master class will be awarded the ribbon and any prizes offered for this placement after the Advanced B, Excellent B and Master classes have been judged and after the announcement of those final scores. The superintendent or show or trial secretary will mark the catalog with an "HTQ" to identify the dog receiving this award.

     In the case of tied scores between dogs eligible for the above award, the dog completing the three courses in the least amount of combined time will receive the award. In the event that both the score and time are the same, each dog will be tested again, individually, by performing a course as chosen by the judge. The original scores will not be changed, but a plus (+) will be added after the score of the dog winning the runoff. The judge for a run-off will be designated by the club from among the judges of the rally trial.

     When a run-off has been completed, the judge will record the results on a special sheet that identifies the dogs taking part in the run-off by catalog number, class and breed. When the judge has marked and signed the sheet, it will be turned over to the superintendent or show or trial secretary who will mark the catalog accordingly and forward the sheet to the AKC as part of the records of the trial. If a club chooses to allow dogs listed with AKC Canine Partners to enter their trial, such dogs are eligible for the Highest Triple Qualifying Score in the Advanced B, Excellent B and Master classes.

 

Chapter 4 Section 2. Rally Intermediate Class. To be eligible for this class dogs must have won the Rally Novice (RN) title but have not earned a qualifying score in a Rally Advanced. All dogs are judged on leash.

     Rally Intermediate must have between 12 to 17 signs (Start and Finished not included) with a minimum of three and a maximum of seven stationary signs. Intermediate courses will have a minimum of three Advanced level signs. There are no jumps in this class.

     The letters RI may be added after the name of each dog that has been certified by at least two different judges to have received qualifying scores in Intermediate class at three licensed or member rally trials. That dog will receive a Rally Intermediate certificate from the AKC.

 

Section 3. Rally Advanced Class. The Rally Advanced A Class. To be eligible for this class, dogs shall have won the Rally Novice (RN) title, or the Rally Intermediate (RI) title, but have not won the Rally Advanced (RA) title or any AKC Obedience title (including optional class titles) prior to the close of entries. The Rally Advanced B Class. To be eligible for this class, dogs shall have won the Rally Novice (RN) title, or the Rally Intermediate (RI) title prior to the close of entries.

 

Section 4. Rally Excellent Class.

 

Section 5. Rally Master Class. To be eligible for this class a dog must have won the Rally Excellent (RE) title.

     All dogs are judged off leash.

     The Master class must have between 15 to 20 signs (Start and Finish not included) with a minimum of three and a maximum of seven stationary signs.

     Courses will have a minimum of three Advanced level signs, three Excellent level signs, four Master level signs plus the one required jump sign

     There are no retries for any of the signs on the Rally Master course.

     Unlike in the Rally Novice, Intermediate and Advanced classes, in the Rally Master class handlers are not allowed to pat their legs or clap their hands to encourage the dog. Verbal encouragement, multiple commands and/or inaudible signals using one or both arms and hands are allowed; the handler’s arms need not be maintained in any particular position at any time. Handlers may not touch their dog or make any physical corrections.

     The letters RM may be added after the name of each dog that has been certified by at least two different judges to have received qualifying scores in the Master class at ten licensed or member rally trials. That dog will receive a Rally Master certificate from the AKC.

     The letters RM will be followed by a numeric designation indicating the number of times a dog has met the requirements of the RM title as defined in these regulations. (RM2 for 20 qualifying scores, RM3 for 30 qualifying scores, RM4 for 40 qualifying scores, etc.)

 

Section 6. Jumps. A dog is required to jump once in the Advanced class, twice in the Excellent class and once in the Master class.

 

Chapter 5 Section 1. Dogs that May Compete. Rally Championship points will be recorded for dogs after they have earned the Rally Master title. When a dog earns the Rally Champion title, it may continue to compete and earn points.

 

Section 2. Championship Points. Rally Championship points will be recorded for dogs earning a score of 91 or better in the Rally Master class. A dog must earn a total of 300 points. Additionally, the dog must have received qualifying scores in Advanced B, Excellent B and the Master class, on the same day at the same trial at 20 separate licensed or member rally trials.

 

Section 3. Point Schedule.

Master Class

Score

Points

91 1
92 1
93 1
94 1
95 1
96 1
97 2
98 3
99 4
100 5

 

Section 4. Rally Champion Title. The AKC will issue a Rally Champion certificate and will permit the use of the letters RACH preceding the name of each dog that meets the requirements. The letters RACH will be followed by a numeric designation indicating the number of times a dog has met the requirements of the RACH title as defined in these regulations. (RACH2 for 40 triple qualifying scores and 600 points, RACH3 for 60 triple qualifying scores and 900 points, etc.)

 

Licensed Beagle Derby Stakes The Board VOTED to have AKC license derby stakes held at Beagle Federation field trials. Previously, derby stakes were not licensed by the AKC. This is a change to the Beagle Field Trial Rules and must be approved by the delegate body. It will be read to the Delegates in March 2017 and voted on in June 2017. If approved by the Delegates, federations may start applying for licensed derby stakes after October 1, 2017 for trials held after January 1, 2018. (Changes Underlined)

 

CHAPTER 9. Description of Classes and Championship Requirements.

New SECTION 3. Licensed Derby Stakes. A Beagle association or federation may, at their option, offer one licensed derby stake per calendar year. The licensed derby stake may be held in conjunction with a licensed field trial or may be a stand-alone event. If the license derby stake is held as a stand-alone event, the normal event application fee shall apply. All Rules applying to Beagle Field Trials shall apply to the Derby classes.

     To be eligible to participate in a Derby class, a dog must meet the definition of a Derby dog as specified in the Standard Procedures, Sanctioned Beagle Field Trials section provided later in this book.

 

SECTION 5. Field Champion Title Requirements. The total number of wins and championship points necessary for a Beagle to be recorded a Field Champion by the American Kennel Club shall be established by the Board of Directors of the American Kennel Club. The wins and points may be acquired in both the 13 inch and 15 inch classes.

     To be recorded a Field Champion, a hound of must have won three first places and 120 points in classes with not less than six starters at licensed or member field trials. No more than one first place and 40 points earned in derby stakes may count toward the Field Champion title.

 

Beagle Field Champion Only Stakes and Grand Field Champion Title The Board VOTED to approve a recommendation for the AKC to license Field Champion only stakes at Beagle field trials and award the title of Grand Field Champion (GFC) to dogs that earn a designated number of wins and points from FC only stakes.

     The Board also VOTED to approve a recommendation for the AKC to award the title of Grand Field Champion to dogs that earn two first places and accumulate 90 points in FC only stakes. Dogs that have earned the GFC title may continue to compete in order to earn GFC numeric titles (GFC2).

     This is a change to the Beagle Field Trial Rules and must be approved by the Delegate body. It will be read to the Delegates in March 2017 and voted on in June 2017. If approved by the Delegates, clubs may start applying for licensed FC Only stakes after October 1, 2017 for trials held after January 1, 2018.

 

Updates to Agility Equipment and Use The Board VOTED to modify some of the equipment used in AKC agility in order to modernize and improve safety. In addition, two new jumps are also added to the AKC program to add variety and keep the sport fresh. Also, changes were approved to the equipment used in the International Sweepstakes Class (ISC) in order to keep this class aligned with the FCI agility program.

     The equipment changes must be implemented no later than January 2, 2018 by the clubs. All of the equipment changes can be implemented immediately by clubs if they have conforming equipment with the exception of the new pause table heights, which will become effective January 2, 2018. The changes to Chapter 14, of the ISC Regulations, are effective April 1, 2017, which corresponds to the start of the qualifying year for the 2018 World Team tryouts.

 

Change to Premier Jumpers with Weaves Course Time The Board VOTED to increase the course times slightly for some jump heights in the Premier Jumpers with Weaves class and to refine the jump heights from three to five groupings. The Premier class launched in October 2015. The initial course times were based on testing prior to implementation, however, given the critical nature of course times to the success of the sport, it was prudent to continue to study this after launch. Based on data collected and input from judges, the staff is recommending a refinement of the jump heights from three to five groupings in both the Regular and Preferred classes and a slight increase in course times in six out of the ten jump heights.

 

Norwegian Elkhounds Eligible to Participate in AKC Herding Events The Board VOTED to approve a request from the Norwegian Elkhound Association of America to allow the Norwegian Elkhound breed to participate in the AKC Herding program. This will become effective April 1, 2017.

 

Retriever Field Trials - Allow Optional System of Rotation The Board VOTED to allow retriever field trial clubs the option of using a system of rotation for Derby and Qualifying stakes. Currently a rotating system is only allowed in All-Age stakes. Clubs wishing to take advantage of this option would be required to publish advance notice in their premium list.

     This proposed rule change originates from the Retriever Field Trial Advisory Committee after conducting a vote to all licensed retriever field trial clubs. 84% of the clubs voted in favor of this change. Staff agrees with the Retriever Field Trial Advisory Committee’s view that a system of rotation will give all dogs an equal opportunity to run early or late and bring greater consistency for all stakes.

     This is a change to the Field Trial Rules and Standard Procedure for Retrievers. It will be read at the March Delegates’ meeting and voted on at the June Delegates’ meeting. If approved, the effective date will be October 1, 2017.

 

Nederlandse Kooikderhondje Eligibility to Compete in the Sporting Group The Board VOTED to approve the requests from the Nederlandse Kooikerhondje Club of the United States of America (NKCUSA) which was seeking acceptance of the breed into the AKC Stud Book and for the Nederlandse Kooikderhondje to be eligible to compete in the Sporting Group. The breed will be eligible to compete in the Sporting Group January 3, 2018. The Breed standard (below) is approved as the official standard for the breed. The breed will be moved from the Foundation Stock Service into the Stud Book of the American Kennel Club on January 1, 2018. The Stud book will close on January 1, 2018.

STANDARD OF THE NEDERLANDSE KOOIKERHONDJE

GENERAL APPEARANCE The Nederlandse Kooikerhondje is a harmoniously built orange-red parti-colored small sporting dog of almost square body proportions. He moves with his head held high; in action, the well-feathered waving tail is carried level with, or above the topline. The ears may have black hair at the tips, the so-called earrings. The dog is presented with a natural, untrimmed coat. Visible scissoring or grooming, except for neatening the feet, is to be severely penalized.

SIZE PROPORTION, SUBSTANCE Size - Ideal height at the withers: Males 16 inches, Females 15 inches. Disqualification - 1 inches under the ideal height after 1 year of age or 1 inches above the ideal height at any age. Proportion - Skull and muzzle are of about equal length. The length of the body from the point of the shoulder (at the scapula/humerus) to the point of the buttocks should be slightly longer than the height at the withers. Length of forelegs from ground to elbow should be equal to depth of body from elbow to withers. Substance - strong bone, but not heavy.

 

HEAD The head is of moderate length, fitting in with the general appearance, clean- cut, with flowing lines. Eyes - Almond-shaped, dark brown with a friendly, alert expression. Ears - Medium size, set above eye level but always lower than the top of the skull. The ears are carried close to the cheeks without a fold. Ear leather should easily reach the inner corner of the eye. Well feathered. Black hair tips ("earrings") are highly desirable. Skull - Sufficiently broad, moderately rounded. Stop - Seen in profile clearly visible but not too deep. Muzzle - Should be a blunt wedge seen from above or in profile, not too deep, nor tapering too much. Well filled under the eye, creating a smooth transition from muzzle to skull. Planes (Muzzle & Skull) - Straight muzzle, almost parallel planes. Nose - Black and well developed. Lips - Preferably well pigmented, close fitting and not pendulous. Bite - Scissors bite. Complete dentition preferable. Level bite acceptable, but less desirable

 

NECK, TOPLINE, BODY Neck - Medium length to balance body, clean-cut and strongly muscled. Topline - Smooth level line from the withers to hipbones with a slightly rounded croup. Chest - Reaching to the elbows with moderate spring of ribs. Underline - Slight tuck-up towards the loin. Back - Strong and straight, rather short. Loin - Short and broad, strongly muscled. Tail - Set on so as to follow the topline of the body. Well-feathered with a white plume. The last vertebra should reach the hock joint. When gaiting, carried level with the topline, with an upward curve or almost straight up. Not curling with a ring or circling over the back. When standing, the tail may be held downward.

 

FOREQUARTERS Shoulders - Shoulder moderately angled in order to create a flowing line from neck to back. Upper Arm - Moderately angled to match layback of shoulder blade, which is of equal length. Forechest I Prosternum - Point of forechest should be slightly protruding beyond the point of the shoulder. Elbow - Close to the body.

     Legs - Straight and parallel, strong bone of sufficient density and length. Pastertics - Strong and slightly oblique. Forefeet - Small, slightly oval, compact, toes pointing forward.

 

HINDQUARTERS Angulation - Moderately angulated, to match forequarters. Seen from the rear, straight and parallel. Legs - Strong bone. Upper Thigh - well muscled. Second Thigh - length equal to upper thigh. Hock Joint - well let down. Hind Feet - Small, oval, compact, toes pointing forward.

 

COAT Hair - Of medium length, close lying. May be slightly wavy or straight, but never curly or open. Soft, but with enough texture to be weather resistant. Functional undercoat. Front legs should have moderate feathering reaching to the pastern joints. Hind legs should have fairly long feathered breeches. No feathering below the hock joints. The coat on the head, the front part of the legs and the feet should be short. Sufficiently feathered on the underside of the tail. Longer hair on throat and forechest. Earrings (long feathered black hair tips) are highly desirable.

 

COLOR Distinct patches of clear orange-red on pure white are ideal. A few small spots on the legs or muzzle are acceptable. Chest, belly, and the majority of the legs and tail should be white. Orange red color should predominate on the head and torso and may be present as a mantle or blanket, but is less desirable than distinct patches. Some black hair intermingling with the orange-red color and a slight form of ticking are acceptable, but less desirable. A black tail ring where the color changes from orange-red to white on the tail is permitted.

     Coloring on the head: A clearly visible white blaze running down to the nose. There should be coloring on the cheeks, ideally ending at the comers of the mouth, and around the eyes. A blaze that is too narrow or too wide or only partly colored cheeks is less desirable. Color should be a consideration only when all else between two dogs is equal. Disqualification - Color that is black and white or tri-color.

 

GAIT Should be flowing and light-footed, with moderate reach and drive. Limbs parallel.

 

TEMPERAMENT Lively and agile, self-confident and with sufficient perseverance and stamina. Good natured and alert, however not noisy. The breed is faithful, easygoing and friendly to his owners and can be a bit reserved with strangers. When not luring ducks into elaborate man-made traps, the dog is expected to find and kill vermin, and to alert his family to strangers on the property. Hence he needs to be keen, swift and tough. He is a true sporting dog, being attentive and energetic and having a zest for working and with a cheerful character.

 

FAULTS Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and the functional health and welfare of the dog and on its ability to perform its traditional work. Ears too small. Ears half-erect, "flying ears". Tail that is too curled. Hackney gait. Curly or silky hair. Open coat. Color that is heavily interspersed with black hairs in the orange-red patches. Too much ticking.

 

SEVERE FAULTS Anxious behavior. Distinctly low on legs, out of proportion. Blue or yellow eye(s). Undershot or overshot bite. Tail too short, vertebrae not reaching hock- joint. White color on ears, partly or completely. White hair around eyes, one or both.

 

DISQUALIFICATIONS 1 inches under the ideal height after 1 year of age or 1 inches above the ideal height at any age. Color that is black and white or tri-color.

Approved October 28, 2016 Effective April 1, 2017

 

Update Policies for Ineligible Words in Registered Kennel Names The Board VOTED to update the current policy for ineligible words in registered kennel names to allow for the use of names of cities and family names. The revised policy for ineligible words is:

     Ineligible words would include, but are not limited to, conflict either phonetically or in spelling with: the name of a breed, AKC titles, corporations or trade names, names of famous and universally recognized persons, living or dead, or words commonly used in the naming of dogs.

 

Appointment of AKC PAC Board Members to the AKC PAC Board The Board VOTED to reappoint Mr. David Helming, Ms. Gail LaBerge and Mr. William Marlow to serve new two-year terms on the AKC PAC Board and to appoint Dr. Carmen Battaglia and Ms. Karolynne McAteer to serve new two-year terms on the AKC PAC Board.

 

Parent Club Sponsored Semen Bank The Board VOTED to approve the Otterhound Club of America request that the AKC Board allow an entity, such as a LLC, to own and authorize the use of frozen semen to help preserve long-term health and viability of the breed. In order to accommodate this and future requests, the Board VOTED to modify the Board Policy by adding the following:

     With AKC Board Approval, a Parent Club sponsored, breed specific, frozen semen bank may be allowed to own frozen semen and to apply for frozen semen litter registration as a semen owner. Parent Clubs seeking to establish such an entity must petition the AKC Board via letter signed by the club’s current president. The letter should explain the club’s purpose for establishing the bank and acceptably document its incorporation and organizational relationship to the petitioning Parent Club. Upon Board approval, the bank must annually provide AKC with a listing of signatories for use in AKC Registration matters.

 

The Board also approved the modification of the AKC Procedures for Registration Matters, XI, C., by adding the following statement:

 

5. With AKC Board approval, a Parent Club sponsored, breed specific, frozen semen bank may be allowed to own frozen semen and to apply for frozen semen litter registration as a semen owner, provided all other requirements to register the litter are met. Such an entity must have a valid Annual Breed Reproductive Bank Signatory Authorization form on file listing those semen bank officer(s) authorized to sign the frozen semen litter applications on behalf of the organization. The Annual Breed Reproductive Bank Signatory Authorization must include the signature of the applicable parent club president. The authorization form must be resubmitted annually.

 

EXECUTIVE SESSION There was an Executive Session to discuss the monitoring and improving of the quality and effectiveness of AKC educational content.

 

BUSINESS UPDATE Alexandra Aleskovsky, Executive Vice President and Chief Growth Officer gave the Board a business update as follows.

 

Revenue - Total Growth Group revenues were up by 10.6% for 2016. Key areas driving growth included:

 - Registration +5.6%

 - E-Commerce +97.5%

 - Digital Advertising +99%

 - Marketplace +56.2%

 

Strategic partnerships are one of the keys to expanding AKC’s reach to the dog owning public and the Growth Group is continuing to develop new relationships.

 

Ms. Aleskovsky reported that Video Content will be essential in furthering the mission of AKC and that video is the key to creating great engagement on our website. The average consumer view 206 videos per month and we want to make sure AKC has a portion of those videos.

     It is expected that 30 original videos will be produced in 2017 with a focus on breed videos (in collaboration with the relevant Parent Club) and AKC Mission videos. Ms. Aleskovsky also updated the Board on the status of Information Technology. The move to the cloud is on schedule with closing of the Raleigh Data Center by December 31, 2018. In addition implementation of a state of the art Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system is well underway with a steering committee in place to oversee the project. Many of AKC’s applications are built on old technology and a plan is in place to update them to newer platforms. This will result in lower overall maintenance costs and the ability to more quickly make needed system enhancements.

 

Registered Handler Program Ms. Elizabeth Sorota and members of her team along with Tim Thomas, joined this portion of the meeting to report on the marketing research that had been conducted to understand the perception, strengths, and weaknesses of the current program. The research was conducted in January 2017. There was a review of a survey taken among past and present members of the program. There was agreement that there was a need for AKC to better promote it, that the website needed improvement, that admission standards be more rigorous, and that the membership fee should be re-evaluated. It is anticipated that staff will make specific recommendations at a future meeting.

 

AKC Ownership of DNA Based on a request from the Board, Staff provided information on the AKC’s ownership of canine DNA submitted to AKC by dog owners. According to the Terms and Conditions on DNA sample submission forms received by AKC since 2010: “All DNA samples become the property of the AKC.”

 

DELEGATES and CLUBS - A report was provided on Member Club Bylaws approved in December and January: American Chesapeake Club (1918) Kettle Moraine Kennel Club, Washington County, WI (1998) Saccarappa Obedience Club, Westbrook, ME (1990)

 

EXECUTIVE SESSION There was an Executive Session to discuss sensitive business matters with nothing reported out of this session.

 

The Board adjourned at 4:50 p.m. - Meeting reconvened on Tuesday, February 10, 2017 at 8:00 am. All Directors were present except Ms. McAteer, whose flight was cancelled due to weather. Also present were the Executive Secretary, the Assistant Executive Secretary, the Senior Executive Vice President and General Counsel, as well as the Executive Vice President and Chief Growth Officer.

 

FINANCE Joseph Baffuto, Chief Financial Officer, presented unaudited 2016 year-end financial results. Total actual revenues for the year of $66.4 million were 2.8% above Budget and 6.8% above the 2015 year. Overall operating expenses of $61.3 million were below Budget by $500,000, or 1%, but $7.9 million or 14.8% greater than 2015 actuals. Operating income of $5.1 million outperformed the 2016 Budget but is below last year’s comparison of $8.8 million through December 31, 2015. Additionally, investment results in 2016 yielded $6.0 million in unrealized gains versus $3.8 million in unrealized losses during 2015. Overall, a successful year for AKC from a financial standpoint.

 

PENSION INVESTMENT COMMITTEE Dr. Garvin, Chairman of the Pension Investment Committee, reported that the committee had adopted amendments to the 401(k) plan regarding its administration and automatic increases. The Board expressed it consensus (absent dissent) that AKC would continue to pay the fees to administer its 401(k) for employees.

 

Canine Health Foundation Update Diane Brown, DVM, PhD, DACUP, Chief Executive Officer of the AKC Canine Health foundation participated in this portion of the meeting.

     Dr. Brown reported on the activities of the AKC CHF over the past year. They included the focus on tick borne diseases and Theriogenology residencies at North Carolina State University, Ohio State University, Auburn University, and the University of Pennsylvania. She indicated that in 2017 there will be a major initiative involving epilepsy and that on August 11-17, 2017 there will be a National Parent Club Canine Health conference in St. Louis.

     The Board expressed appreciation for the leadership Dr. Brown and Dr. Garvin in moving the AKC Canine Health Foundation forward. The ability to grow the quality of the research, to engage the Parent Clubs through focused initiatives, and to foster a positive relationship among all stakeholders was shared.

 

JUDGING OPERATIONS AKC Canine College Update The Staff provided the Board of Directors with a quarterly status report on the progress of the AKC Canine College. All data reported reflects the time period of September 27, 2016 (launch) to December 31, 2016.

     The AKC Canine College had a total of 15,962 unique visitors. Two thousand five hundred and forty-one (2,541) of the 15,962 unique visitors have enrolled in a total of 6,108 courses or exams.

     The number of enrollments in Breed Courses and Breed Resources is expected to increase as the Judging Operations Department continues its efforts to educate the judging community about how the courses might be used and how CEUs will be applied.

 

CONFORMATION - Changes to Dogs Counted for Select for Grand Championship Points Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 16, Section 6 The Board reviewed a recommendation to change Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 16, Section 6, to include the Select Dog/Bitch in the calculation of Grand Championship points for that award.

     Currently, dogs awarded Select do not count themselves in the point calculations for that award; the dogs defeated of their sex in Best of Breed/Variety plus those in the regular classes of their sex are the only ones included. This recommendation would include the dog awarded Select in the point calculation for that award. By making this change, breeds/varieties with lower entries would more often be able to achieve points when awarded Select. For example, if there are two dogs entered in Best of Breed and one dog in the regular classes and the lowest point schedule is used (2 dogs = 1 point and 3 dogs = 2 points), the dog awarded Best of Breed receives 2 points. Under the current rules, the dog awarded Select does not receive any points because only the regular class dog is counted. With the proposed change, the Select dog would receive 1 point as they count the regular class dog and themselves. There was a consensus that this should be submitted to the Delegate Dog Show Rules Committee for input.

 

Monitoring Events Offering the NOHS The Staff provided an update on the monitoring of events offering the AKC National Owner- Handled Series (NOHS). The recent change to make NOHS governed by regulations has caused some clubs concern over the judge requirements. To date there has been no impact on the number of Clubs offering this important special attraction. However, for clubs uncertain how to meet the intent of the regulations they are urged to contact Club Development in Raleigh for assistance. The Board’s goal is to assist clubs in successfully offering the NOHS.

 

Does the Asterisk Make a Difference? In order to review the impact of the asterisk being added to the judges book for entries eligible for NOHS, the staff provided a report calculating the frequency of a dog winning Best of Breed (BOB) and also winning Best of Breed Owner-Handled (BOBOH) when BOBOH was awarded and there was more than one competitor in the breed/variety. The data clearly shows there has been no significant impact on the frequency of an Owner Handler winning regular Best of Breed since the asterisk was put in place.

  2014 2015 2016

Total BOBOH Awarded

22,277 39,734 55,704
Of the Dogs Awarded BOBOH, How Many Were Also Awarded BOB? 7,888 14,029 19,545
Percentage of BOBOH Dogs Also Earning BOB 35.4% 35.3% 35.1%

 

Update on Junior Initiatives Staff provided a summary of the initiatives that have been approved by the AKC Board that contribute to the support of Juniors participating in AKC Events. These initiatives serve to bring awareness to clubs about the importance of Juniors and encouraging young people to participate in AKC Events.

     Notable Enhancements to the Junior Program Include:

 • 2014 – All Rules/Regs changed to allow clubs to offer lower entry fees for Juniors

 • Feb 2015 – Reserve Best Junior Handler

 • July 2015 – Pee Wee Class (53 classes held in 2016, follow up emails sent to participants)

 • July 2015 – Limited Status Junior Judges

 • July 2015 – Master Class Revision (changed number of wins required to qualify for Master class)

 • Feb 2016 - Reserve Best Junior Handler Mandatory at All Breed Shows

 • April 2016 – Novice Class Criteria, Best Junior win with competition counts towards criteria to move to the Open Class, effective July 1, 2016

 • May 2016 - AKC Junior Recognition System, effective March 1, 2017

 • July 2016 - Junior Only Trials for Companion Events, effective February 1, 2017 (Junior Showcase Event)

 • November 2016- Limited Breed Shows have the option to offer All Breed Junior Showmanship, effective January 1, 2017.

 • November 2016- Juniors allowed to handle a dog in a lower level herding class even if the dog has acquired a qualifying score at a higher level. Effective March 1, 2017.

 • December 2016-Farm Dog Certification Test application fee waived for junior organizations.

     In 2016 Junior numbers issued increased by 9%.

 

Two Shows in One Day and 4/3 Split Over Two Days Promotion At its January 10, 2017 meeting, the AKC Board requested information concerning how staff was going to promote the option of holding two Multiple All-Breed or Limited Breed Shows in One Day and the 4 groups in one day, 3 groups and BIS in the second day.

     The Pilot program was distributed through the normal AKC channels: Post Board reports, Club communications, posting on the website and information upon request. AKC will follow-up with those communication paths announcing the removal of the pilot program and promoting the success clubs have had.

     The Events Department has been promoting both the two shows in one day and the 4/3 option to clubs that have indicated they are looking for new ideas. AKC Club Development will offer this option in a proactive manner. In 2016 there were 194 conformation dog shows (105 Clubs) with less than 500 entries. There were 8 days of back to back All-Breed events in 2016.

 

Sports & Events Initiative - Making Life Easier For Clubs The Staff provided a review of the notable changes approved or implemented in 2016 to make it easier for clubs to hold events.

 

Conformation

 • Sweepstakes – simplified the application process and alleviated the need to provide classes and judges for sweepstakes.

 • Common Site Applications – allowed clubs to acknowledge the agreement individually and by email, eliminating the need to have all clubs sign the same form.

 • Grooming plans – no longer required.

 • Isolated clubs – modified the policy to consider driving miles in addition to straight miles.

 • Concurrent Specialties - modified policy to provide concurrent specialties the flexibility to schedule judging before or after the breed is judged in the regular show.

 • Disqualified Dogs – established and implemented a process to make a list of disqualified dogs available to clubs, superintendents and trial secretaries.

 • Conformation B Matches - modified the B match requirements to allow a Conformation specialty club to hold a B match open to their group or all breeds (previously limited to just their breed). Group clubs may hold a B match open to all breeds (previously limited to just their group).

 • Conformation B Matches – added B matches to the AKC website event search, and improved the B match email promotion process by allowing clubs to provide customized information for their event.

 • Event Closeout Notification – modified the process to notify clubs by email rather than postal mail.

 • Implemented processes to support the submission of an event application effective for multiple years.

 • Developed “Helpful Reminders” document for new clubs applying for sanctioned matches (applies to conformation, obedience and rally).

 • Developed “Keys to Successful Record Keeping” check list that is provided to new clubs when they are approved to hold their first sanctioned match (applies to conformation, obedience and rally).

 • Clubs can provide their premium lists, judging programs, and catalogs in a digital format

 • Created a department (Club Development) dedicated to working cooperatively with clubs to enhance their ability to hold quality events.

 

Companion Events

 • Initiated mentored event process for existing clubs adding a companion event. This eliminated the need for a sanctioned match. (24 mentored companion events were held in 2016.)

 • Allowed Obedience and/or Rally trials to co-exist with permission of the date owning club.

 • Allowed Agility single breed specialty trials to be held in conjunction with an all-breed trial.

 • Eliminated the requirement that Agility participants wear identifying numbers.

 • Junior Showcase Events - Allowed companion sports to hold events open to Juniors only. (eff Feb 2017)

 • Clarified the regulations to allow for the sanctioning of new clubs that are formed to hold Rally.

 • Modified the Agility FAST class regulations to allow course equipment changes to be made more efficiently, saving clubs about one hour per FAST class event. (eff Jan 2017)

 • Modified the match requirements to (1) allow Obedience clubs to become licensed after holding one sanctioned A match (previously two); (2) allow Obedience specialty clubs to hold sanctioned A matches open to all breeds (previously limited to just their breed). (eff Jan 2017)

 

Performance Events

 • Modified the criteria for sanctioning new Performance Event clubs to be based on membership rather than geographic location.

 

COMPANION AND PERFORMANCE Obedience and Rally - Closing of Entries - The Board reviewed a recommendation for obedience and rally to establish their own Regulations regarding the closing time for entries and that the closing time shall be no later than 11:59 pm on the third Wednesday prior to the trial for trials held on Friday through Monday. Currently the Regulations governing these sports do not address a closing time for entries. Therefore, the sports default to those specified in the Rules Applying to Dog Shows. This will be discussed further at the April meeting.

 

Gordon Setter Club of America National Gun Dog Championship The Board reviewed a recommendation to grant the Gordon Setter Club of America the right to hold a National Gun Dog Championship field trial. The dog who wins the event would be granted the title NGDC. The event is limited to walking handlers. This is consistent with events currently held by Brittanys, German Shorthaired Pointers, Vizslas and Irish Setters. This is an addition to the Pointing Breed Field Trial Rules. If approved by the Board, it must be approved by the Delegate body. If approved by the Delegates, the breed will be allowed to hold a National Gun Dog Championship in 2018.

 

Retriever Field Trials – Declaration of Amateur Status The Board reviewed a recommendation to provide retriever field trial handlers a method by which to proclaim their change of status from a professional handler to an amateur. The process would require a handler seeking to compete in Amateur stakes to submit their declaration to Retriever News, where it would be published for free noting the specific declaration date. This is an addition to the “Standing Recommendations of the Retriever Advisory Board”. The Standing Recommendations are not considered as part of AKC Rules and changes may be FINAL Pg. 22 February 9-10, 2017 made by a vote of the Board. If approved, the effective date will be May 1, 2017. This will be discussed further at the April meeting.

 

Canine Good Citizen Status Report The Board reviewed a progress report on the AKC Canine Good Citizen Program. Since 2013 when CGC became a title, the number of certificates and titles sold has increased by 62%. In 2016, 63,970 certificates/titles were sold, up 6% from the previous year. The number of CGC Evaluators is at an all-time high. The program finished 2016 with 11,457 approved evaluators, up 7.4% for the year.

 

Registration Value Proposition Mark Dunn, AKC Senior Vice President, Registration and Customer Development, participated in this portion of the meeting. Ms. Aleskovsky reviewed the research that had been done on how registration is perceived by “non-fancy” registrants and how AKC can create a “value proposition” which will encourage more registrations creating a relationship with more dog owners. She reviewed how we currently position a registration with a dog owner and how we can more effectively position it going forward. The Board agreed that the new positioning has the potential improve registrations and looks forward to following its implementation.

     As part of the research the pricing of the various registration offerings was considered. As a result, recommendations were made by staff to change some of the pricing and to encourage registrants to use the on-line registration option through pricing differentiation. Following a motion by Mr. Gladstone, seconded by Mr. Dok, it was VOTED (unanimously) to:

 • Maintain the basic online registration fee at $30.00 until the puppy is six months old, after which the fee will be $34.99 effectively incentivizing online and early registration.

 • Increase the price for a paper registration to $34.99 (currently 60% of registrations are online).

 • Modify the various bundles with fees set at $42.99, $59.99, and $79.99

 

Encouraging online registration will help AKC reduce the costs of manual processing, improve service time and provide more pet owners with easy access to the discounted purchases of registration upgrades, including AKC Reunite, Pet Poison Hotline and AKC Good Dog Helpline. In addition, the addition of the 6 month age to lose the reduced registration fee will create some urgency. Such urgency does not exist today. These changes will become effective and announced when the necessary programming has been completed. Following discussion initiated by Dr. Battaglia, Ms. Aleskovsky stated that the information relative to Growth’s presentations to the Board would be included in Growth’s section of the Board Book in advance or, if confidential, provided separately earlier in the week preceding each Board meeting to permit ample time for Directors to review same in advance of each Board meeting.

 

Reinstated Judge: Mr. Ken Matthews

 

Resigned Judges: Mr. Chester Spraski, Jr.

 

Emeritus Judges: Sharlene Manderson

 

Deceased Judges: Mrs. Alice E. Berd, Mrs. Phyllis T. Brayton, Joyce Ostby

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