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 AKC Board Minutes,Chairman's Report

AKC Board Meeting Minutes

Meeting held October 9th-10th, 2017 (AKC Published 10/23/2017)

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The American Kennel Club Board Actions for October are listed below.

 

To search for specific subject, person, or word in the American Kennel Club minutes, use (Ctrl F) "find" command. Wording is exactly as presented in the Minutes provided by American Kennel Club Secretary James Crowley, with addition of bolded subject text.


 

The Board convened on Monday, October 9, 2017 at 8:00 a.m. All Directors were present. Also present was the Executive Secretary. The August 2017 Board minutes, copies of which were provided to all Directors, were discussed. Upon a motion by Mr. Dok, seconded by Mr. Wooding, the August 2017 minutes were approved unanimously.

 

PRESIDENT’S REPORT Board Action Items - Mr. Sprung reviewed Action Items and reported on the initiatives of staff and affiliates in connection with the disaster relief efforts in the aftermath of the California wildfires and Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. It was further reported that Mr. Sprung established a Committee comprising staff from AKC, AKC Reunite, AKC Canine Health Foundation and AKC Humane Fund to plan courses of action to assist dogs in preparation for future natural disasters.

 

Limited Registration - The Board discussed limited registration and affirmed that there is no desire to eliminate the Limited Registration option. The Board asked staff to research the use of limited and the possible unintended consequences some uses of Limited Registration. Staff should reach out to Parent clubs and breeders to learn how and why they use limited.

 

Legal Status Report - Jay Waks, Senior Executive Vice President and General Counsel and Heather McManus, Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, presented a status report on pending litigation and other Legal activities for the months of August and September 2017.

 

FINANCE - Joseph Baffuto, CFO, presented AKC’s unaudited financial results through the eight months ended August 31, 2017. Total revenues of $47.4 million were 1.2% above budget and 10.1% greater than 2016. Dog Registrations volume was 2% above budget and 7% higher than 2016, along with Litters processed being 1% above budget and 6% higher than last year as well. Total operating expenses of $42.6 million were 7.4% below budget, but 15.3% higher than 2016. YTD Operating income of $4.8 million has exceeded the budget of $837,000 for the eight month period, but is below the prior year’s recorded actual of $6.1 million. Our investment portfolio reflects unrealized gains on investments totaling $7.6 million year to date, which combined with operating income reflects AKC as a total net income of $12.4 million at August 31, 2017.

 

2018 BUDGET - The Board reviewed the proposed 2018 Budget. Mr. Sprung explained that the 2018 budget represents investments in key areas and new initiatives to grow the American Kennel Club in the future and to continue to position AKC for success in its mission to dogs. The Board was pleased that staff and Board are focused on the future and that this budget reflected that joint commitment. There was an in-depth discussion of the 2018 Budget. Following a motion by Dr. Davies, seconded by Mr. Dok, the Board VOTED (affirmative: Mr. Menaker, Dr. Davies, Mr. Carota, Ms. Cruz, Mr. Dok, Mr. Feeney, Dr. Garvin, Mr. Powers, Mrs. Wallin; opposed: Mr. Wooding: abstained: Dr. Battaglia, Ms. Biddle, Ms. McAteer.) to approve the 2018 Budget.

 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY Commercial Filming of Events and “Limited Use” Policy - Jay Waks, Senior Executive Vice President and General Counsel, Heather McManus, Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, and Cynthia Beagles, Vice President and Assistant General Counsel, participated in this portion of the meeting. The Board asked staff to review the AKC’s current commercial filming of events and “limited use” Board policies. The Board adopted a Commercial Filming at Events Contractual Policy on April 12, 2005, and amended it in August 2016. Under the policy, the clubs grant AKC a license to film at the club’s event. In addition, the policy requires clubs to include certain terms in contracts with third parties for commercial filming and/or electronic transmission of AKC events and to include AKC as a party to the contract. The Board, at the same time, adopted exceptions to the policy to allow “limited-use” filming at AKC events. “Limited-use” filming is defined in the policy as “the recording of moving images by individuals or professional[s] … solely for personal consumption or for the purpose of producing a record of the winners for members and the fancy who have special interest in the event, and which is not intended for mass commercial transmission or distribution.” Further, the Board adopted a Commercial Filming at Events Operational Policy on June 22, 2005. The operational policy sets guidelines for camera crews to film at events. The policy specifically does not require editorial news coverage filming to be published or coordinated with AKC, although the event chairman must give permission. Staff reviewed these policies and recommends that the Board revise and update the commercial filming policy. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

Lancashire Heeler- Recommendation to Advance to Miscellaneous - The Board approved the Lancashire Heeler to be eligible for recording in the Foundation Stock Service program with a Herding Group designation in 2001. The United States Lancashire Heeler Club has met the requirements of the Recognition of New Breeds Board Policy approved in February 2017. The club is requesting that it be designated as the Parent Club. The staff recommends that this breed be approved to advance to Miscellaneous. If approved, the breed will be eligible to compete in the Miscellaneous Class effective July 1, 2018. Following a motion by Dr. Davies, seconded by Ms. Biddle, the Board VOTED (unanimously) to consider the matter at this meeting waiving its normal notice procedures. Following a motion by Ms. McAteer, seconded by Mr. Powers the Board VOTED (unanimously) to approve the breed for advancement into Miscellaneous, effective July 1, 2018.

 

Mudi - Recommendation to Advance to Miscellaneous - The Board approved the Mudi to be eligible for recording in the Foundation Stock Service program with a Herding Group designation in 2004. The Mudi has met the requirements of the Recognition of New Breeds Board Policy approved in February 2017. The staff recommends
that this breed be approved to advance to Miscellaneous. If approved, the breed will be eligible to compete in the Miscellaneous Class effective July 1, 2018. Following a motion by Dr. Davies, seconded by Ms. Biddle, the Board VOTED (unanimously) to consider the matter at this meeting waiving its normal notice procedures. Following a motion by Ms. Biddle, seconded by Mr. Powers, the Board VOTED (unanimously) to approve the breed for advancement into Miscellaneous effective July 1, 2018.

 

Registration Information for Lowest Sixty Breeds - Staff provided registration data at the time a breed was recognized for the 60 lowest-registered breeds in 2016, which was discussed by the Board.

 

BUSINESS UPDATE Alexandra Aleskovsky, Executive Vice President and Chief Growth Officer, participated in the discussion of key initiatives including new Business Results, Partnerships, Content and Social Media, Digital Advertising, Sports and Events Marketing, Registrations, and Website Features Enhancements.

     Audience development and consumer demand for the AKC brand continues to demonstrate strong results with over 7.4 million unique visitors coming to AKC.org in August, an increase of 28% from a Year Ago.

     AKC has a leadership position as the #1 Dog Site for traffic and engagement (measured by ComScore) with the majority of traffic continuing to be organic (free). Our Breed, Health, and Dog Care content is resonating with audiences.

     Dog Registrations are up 7.4% YTD. AKC Breeders have increased to 129K, an increase of 7% over a year ago. Casual breeders have gained ground (+10%) while the other segments have remained relatively flat.

     Marketplace continues to experience strong growth with 1.2 Million Unique Puppy seekers coming to Marketplace monthly. Also, 1 out of 5 litters are now listed. Breeders on Marketplace are up 59% vs 2016.

     Revenue for the Growth Group is up 14.3% YTD in August (+$4.2M) vs. 2016 and 2% vs. Budget. Core Business (Registrations, Sponsorships) is increasing with Registrations Revenue up 6.1% YTD in August vs. 2016. Emerging businesses (Marketplace, AKC Shop, and Digital Advertising) have increased 161% YTD in August vs. 2016.

 

Public Education - The Staff provided a progress report on AKC’s public education initiatives. Longstanding programs have been evaluated and are being expanded. New programs are being initiated to further serve the mission of AKC.

 

Updates were provided on the following programs:

     • The Patch Program – The AKC’s patch program for Scouts and 4H will be offered throughout the year and during the AKC National Championship.

     • Canine Ambassadors – directory updated.

     • Public Education Coordinators – online education is planned.

     • Educator Resources – a portion of the AKC website features lesson plans and hands-on learning activities.

     • Education Conferences – staff will visit highly attended education conferences across the country to share information about AKC’s Educator Resources

     • Art Contest – an Art Contest for school children in Orange County, FL, will be held. Finalists will have their art displayed at the National Championship.

 

Review on Theriogenology Literature Regarding the Effects of Canine Breeding Age onthe Health of Puppies and Parents - The AKC Board made a request for a review of the Theriogenology literature regarding the effects of breeding age on the health of dams and puppies. Staff provided a paper authored at AKC’s request by Lindsay Fisher and Dr. Candace Croney of Purdue University’s Center for Animal Welfare Science. The paper states that “little research exists on the effects of breeding ages on the health of sires, dams and puppies” and concludes that further studies are needed in order to take breed and canine size into appropriate consideration before establishing definitive optimal breeding ages. The Board suggested that staff share this information with the AKC Canine Health Foundation and AKC’s Chief Veterinary Officer to see if there are ways AKC could help facilitate this additional needed research.

 

AKC FORM 990 FILING - Representatives of KPMG, AKC’s auditors, gave a presentation on the 2016 Form 990, which AKC is required to file. This was reviewed in EXECUTIVE SESSION. It was reported out of this session that the Board accepted the 2016 Form 990.

 

COMPLIANCE - Dealing with Misconduct at AKC Events – add a Section Concerning Minors Participation - The Legal Department received a request to provide guidelines to Event Committees regarding a minor’s participation in disciplinary actions taken at events, which are handled by Event Committees. Staff is recommending that an additional section be added to Dealing with Misconduct at American Kennel Club Events, addressing matters relating to a minor’s participation in disciplinary matters and if needed, Event Committee hearings. The Board asked staff to continue to work on this memo.

 

COMPANION AND PERFORMANCE - Obedience Stay Exercises - Diane Schultz, Senior Field Representative, participated in this portion of the meeting via conference call. The Board had an in-depth discussion of the recommendation to replace the group exercises in the Obedience Novice and Open Classes with new exercises that will demonstrate a dog’s ability to stay. The change is driven by exhibitor safety concerns that a dog will leave its position during the group exercise and bother another dog. The AKC formed a task force in 2013 to study the safety issues of the group exercises.

     Incremental changes were made at that time. The AKC held an Obedience Advisory Committee in 2014 where several additional recommendations were made to address the safety of dogs during the group exercises. These recommendations were implemented in 2015. In June 2017, AKC held an Obedience Groups Task Force meeting to deliberate the future of group exercises.

     2017 Task Force Recommendations

The 2017 Task Force members agreed (1) safety was of utmost importance, (2) the concern felt by many exhibitors was holding back their participation, and (3) the need to demonstrate a dog’s ability to “stay” was of fundamental importance to the sport. In summary, their recommendations were:

Novice Class

• One of the two Novice class group exercises would be eliminated and replaced with a new individual exercise that demonstrates the dog’s ability to stay. The “Sit Stay – Get Your Leash” exercise will demonstrate how steady a dog is in a stay position, with the handler at a distance. This exercise should further show the judge that the dog is under the handler’s control prior to the team returning to the ring for a group exercise with other dogs in the ring.

• The remaining “Group Exercise – Sit & Down Stay” will be a two-part stay exercise performed on-leash, with the handler holding the leash for safety. Handlers will stand six feet away from the dog and the dog will perform a sit and a down stay. The spacing between dogs has also been increased for safety. If a dog fails the first part of the exercise, they would be released from the second part of the exercise.

Open Class

• Both of the Open class out-of-sight group exercises will be eliminated and be replaced with individual exercises that test a dog’s ability to stay while the handler is at a distance from the dog.

• The “Command Discrimination” exercise is a three-part stay exercise that will demonstrate the handler’s control of the dog from varying distances, as they command the dog to change positions three times (Stand, Down, Sit). The dog must remain in the place that it was left for all three changes of position.

• The “Stay – Get Your Leash” exercise is a two-part sit and down stay exercise that will demonstrate the handler’s control of the dog as they leave the dog in a stay and go a minimum of 30 feet away from the dog, before the judge orders them to return to the dog after one minute. For the second half of the exercise the judge will order the handler to command the dog to change position, then leave the dog to go get the leash; walking at least 30 feet to a place designated by the judge outside of the ring gate entrance. Once the handler reaches the location and picks up their leash, they must wait at the ring entrance for the judge’s order for them to return to the dog. The dog must not move from the position or the place where it was left.

     Stays are in integral part of obedience. Referencing only the current regular classes of Novice and Open, dogs are required to stay in a certain position until commanded otherwise as follows:

 

Current Regulation

Class Required to Stay in Individual Exercises Required to Stay Including the Group Exercise
Novice 2 times 4 times
Open 4 times 6 times

 

The 2017 Task Force recommendations will require a dog to stay in a certain position until commanded otherwise an increased number of times; further establishing that a dog is under the control of its handler. (See table below.)

 

Proposed Change to Regulation

Class Required to Stay Notes
Novice 5* times The stay behavior will increase in both classes.
Open 9 times

 * Includes one Group Exercise, performed on-leash.

 

The stay exercises will also be equally amended in the Preferred Novice, Preferred Open, Graduate Novice, and Team classes.


This recommendation was discussed at the September 2017 Companion Events Delegate Committee meeting. After discussion, the Committee voted to support the change 9 in favor, one opposed.

 

Opinions Received Following Delegates Meeting - Since the Delegates meeting, the Board/staff have received a large number of emails from exhibitors expressing their position on the recommended changes. Approximately 350 emails have been received with 66% expressing support and 19% against and 15% offering a better idea.

 

The Board and Staff received many comments on this issue from the fancy. Suggested changes based on the feedback received were discussed. Staff will consider these responses, particularly as they pertain to education and implementation of the new exercises, and prepare an updated memo for further review in November.

 

Retriever Field Trials – Allow Clubs to hold up to Four Derby/Qualifying Stakes - The Board reviewed a recommendation from the Retriever Field Trial Advisory Committee to allow licensed Retriever Field Trial Clubs to hold up to four Derby Stakes and four Qualifying stakes per calendar year. Currently a club is limited to hold three of each of these stakes per year. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

Agility – Geographically Isolated Clubs - The Board reviewed a Staff recommendation to allow geographically isolated clubs, that are licensed for agility, to hold up to 15 agility trials per year. Currently they are limited to 12 per year. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

Agility – Increase of Judging Limit - The Board reviewed a Staff recommendation to increase the Agility judging limits from 330 runs to 350 runs per day. In some areas of the country and during some times of the year, AKC agility events fill up, and clubs maintain a waiting list. This proposal will allow more exhibitors to
participate. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

AKC Farm Dog Certified Program Status Report - The staff provided the Board with a status report on the new AKC Farm Dog Certified (FDC) program. The FDC program was launched on October 1, 2016. The Farm Dog Certified test provides for a series of twelve exercises that represent situations a farm dog would encounter in a typical farm environment. A video displaying the 12 exercises of the new program was shown to the Board. It is available on the AKC’s website and AKC’s YouTube page: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h08Hv0SDahw

 

• The FDC program was deliberately coupled with the Herding program for the important reason that any test that includes livestock must be administered by persons with experience for the care and welfare of livestock.

• Shortly after launch, the Performance Events Department started to receive inquiries from knowledgeable livestock professionals that they would like to judge the FDC test even though they were not herding judges. Responding to these inquiries, a FDC judge program was created. To-date, over 300 FDC judges have been approved.

• By year end it is anticipated there will be 150 FDC events with 3,000 entries and 650 titles awarded.

• The program has succeeded in attracting new dog owners to the AKC and is indicated by the fact that the FDC is the only title that 26% of these dogs have earned.

 

AKC’s First Scent Work Trials Report - On September 14–17, 2017, the first AKC Scent Work trials were held. The AKC, utilizing employees that will be handling Scent Work applications and results, hosted the first AKC Scent Work Trial. There was one event held per day for four days, with five Novice classes in each event (one class for each of the five elements). Four judges were utilized; all with extensive experience with other Nose Work organizations. They were absolutely delightful and quite helpful to the less experienced exhibitors. There was a limit of 250 entries per day for a total of 1,000 entries. The exhibitors ranged from new-to-the-sport dog owners to owners that had extensive experience in the other Nose Work organizations. Owners from 20 states plus Canada participated. The dogs ranged from Toy Fox Terriers to Mastiffs.

 

REAL ESTATE UPDATE - The Board was presented with a real estate update specific to the AKC Library. Participating in this update were Jan Gross, Principal and Mission Critical Practice Area Leader, M. Arthur Gensler Jr. & Associates, Inc., Rich Speciale of AEQUITAS, LLC, Cathy Dixon, VVA Project Managers and Consultants. Plans that are being developed to showcase the library’s collection were discussed. The Library’s collection of rare books, research materials and historical reference books will be displayed in the new AKC headquarters. Certain aspects of the collection will be curated for display in a dedicated room in the new Museum space so that they can be shared with a larger audience.

 

SMART PET TECHNOLOGIES UPDATE - There was a briefing regarding the LINK AKC Smart Dog Collar. Present for this discussion were Mike Basone, COO Smart Pet Technologies and Herberto Calves, CMO, SVP of Marketing Smart Pet Technologies. Topics discussed included September Cash Spend, Sales Performance through September 2017, Marketing Plans for the rest of 2017 and an Operations Update.

CONSENT - Following a motion by Mr. Menaker, seconded by Mr. Powers it was VOTED (unanimously; absent: Dr. Battaglia) to approve the following Consent Items:

* Delegate and Club Approvals

* Parent Club request to retire Kennel Name “Elmo” for Afghan Hounds

* Finnish Spitz proposed Breed Standard Revision

* French Bulldog proposed Breed Standard Revision

* Russian Toy Miscellaneous Class

* Parent Club Performance Event – Recognizing Drafting Titles for Leonbergers

* Herding – Allowing Ranch Course D

 

* Club Approval - Request for AKC Membership Carolina Working Group Association Charlotte, NC First Licensed Show: November 13, 2014

* Parent Club - Request to Retire Kennel Name “Elmo” The Board VOTED to approve the request from the Afghan Hound Club of America to retire the kennel name “Elmo” for Afghan Hounds. The kennel name was used exclusively by the late Peter Belmont.

* Finnish Spitz - proposed Breed Standard Revision - The Board VOTED to approve the proposed revisions to the Finnish Spitz breed standard as submitted by the Finnish Spitz Club of America (FSCA). The Board granted the Parent Club approval to ballot the FSCA membership in accordance with the Club’s Constitution and Bylaws.

*French Bulldog - proposed Breed Standard Revision The Board VOTED to approve the proposed standard revisions to the French Bulldog breed standard as submitted by the French Bull Dog Club of America (FBCA). The Board granted the Parent Club approval to ballot the FBCA membership in accordance with the Club’s Constitution and Bylaws.

* Russian Toy Miscellaneous Class - The Board VOTED to approve a request from the parent club of the Russian Toy, the Russian Toy Club of America. The breed was approved to be eligible for recording in the Foundation Stock Service® (FSS®) program with a Toy designation in 2008. The Russian Toy Club of America has met the requirements of the Recognition of New Breeds Board Policy approved in February 2017. Requirements include an active parent club, with serious and expanding breeding activity over a wide geographic area, and documented club activity. The Board approved that the breed will move the breed into the Miscellaneous Class, effective July 1, 2018.

*Parent Club Performance Event – Recognizing Drafting Titles for Leonbergers - The Board VOTED to approve a request from The Leonberger Club of America to permit Leonbergers earning titles in the club’s Draft Program to be eligible for drafting title recognition. The Leonberger Club of America (LCA) Draft Test is a series of exercises designed to demonstrate the abilities of the Leonberger to perform in a working capacity including hauling freight. The performance of these skills is intended to demonstrate teamwork between dog and handler resulting from both natural ability and training that are applicable to realistic work situations.

     The LCA Draft Test has eight classes: Novice Draft Dog, Novice Draft Dog Veteran, Brace Novice Draft Dog, Brace Novice Draft Dog Veteran, Open Draft Dog, Open Draft Dog Veteran, Brace Open Draft Dog, and Brace Open Draft Dog Veteran. In the Veteran classes, older dogs compete in the same exercises but are required to haul less weight than in the Regular classes.

* Herding – Allow Ranch Course D - The Board VOTED to approve a recommendation from the Performance Events department to allow an additional type of herding course known as Course D into the AKC herding program. Course D is described as a ranch or stock dog course which scores a dog’s ability to perform and assist a farmer or rancher with herding tasks consistent with those actually needed on a ranch, farm or stockyard. (See Appendix A for full regulation.)

 

CONFORMATION - Realignment of Point Schedule Divisions - The Board reviewed a Staff recommendation to realign the state composition of the Conformation point schedule divisions. The last realignment of states and divisions for the Conformation points schedule was for the schedule that became effective on May 16, 2012. Prior to that, division realignment was done for the point schedules effective in May of 2002, 2004 and 2009. The goal of the realignment is to make the show sizes in a division as equal as possible. These guidelines were used in the realignment:

• Geography is a major factor in defining the states in a division. Other than the singlestate divisions, a state should have a shared border with at least one other state in the division.

• As has always been the case, only all-breed shows are evaluated when aligning the states within a division. The all-breed shows in the 2016 calendar year were used for analysis.

• The average size of a show within a division should be as consistent as possible. This can be measured by calculating the standard deviation of show sizes within each division. Reducing the standard deviation was a consideration when formulating the divisions.

 

Based on extensive analysis, the following changes are recommended to the composition of the Conformation points schedule divisions:

 

1. Move Tennessee to Division 14.

2. Modify Division 6 to consist of two states, Arizona and Colorado.

3. Move Iowa and Missouri to Division 15.

4. Move Kansas to Division 7.

5. Move Nebraska to Division 13.

6. Move Michigan to Division 5.

 

The total variance between the average show size by state compared to the division average will be reduced by 9%, confirming the recommendation is an improvement compared to the current alignment. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

The Board reviewed a Staff recommendation to realign the state composition of the conformation point schedule divisions. The last realignment of states and divisions for the Conformation points schedule was for the schedule that became effective on May 16, 2012. Prior to that, division realignment was done for the point schedules effective in May of 2002, 2004 and 2009. The goal of the realignment is to make the show sizes in a division as equal as possible. These guidelines were used in the review:

 

1. Create a division consisting of Arizona and Colorado. This action addresses inconsistency #1 and #4 identified above.

2. Break up current division 6, moving these four states into three different divisions. This action addresses inconsistency #2 and #3.

3. Move lower Michigan (average = 935 entries) into division #5 with Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky (average = 931 entries). This action addresses incontinency #5.

4. Move Tennessee (average = 788 entries) into division #14 with Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Arkansas (average = 787 entries).

 

The total variance between the average show size by state compared to the division average has been reduced by 9%, indicating the recommendation is an improvement compared to the current alignment.

 

The states that will be advantaged the most by this realignment are Nebraska, Tennessee and Arizona.

 

The states that will be disadvantages the most by this realignment are Colorado and Michigan. It should be noted that these states will still have above average show size compared to their division, just not as a large of an advantage as they currently experience. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

Reinstatement of a Dog Disqualified for Attacking - The Board reviewed a proposal submitted by the Delegate Dog Show Rules subcommittee. They questioned if the submission had been approved by the full Committee in a formal vote. Staff was instructed to write to the Committee to see if this new submission was formally
approved by the full Dog Show Rules Committee, subsequent to the September 2017 Delegate Meeting.

 

Concurrent Event Limits - The Board reviewed a staff recommendation to amend the concurrent event policy to allow clubs to accept more entries. The proposed new wording is: Same Day Specialty Shows

     Two independent specialty shows of the same breed of no more than one hundred entries per ring per judge each, inclusive of sweepstakes, special attractions or matches, may be permitted the same location on the same day.

 

If approved, this change would become effective January 1, 2018. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

Junior Showmanship Regulations, Section 7. Eligibility of a Dog - The Board reviewed a recommendation to allow all FSS breeds to be shown in Junior Showmanship provided the dog has an AKC FSS number. Staff has received multiple inquiries from the breeders of the AKC Foundation Service breeds regarding their children competing in Conformation Junior Showmanship. This is a change to the Conformation Junior Showmanship Regulations and may be made with the approval of the Board. If approved, this change would become effective January 1, 2018. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

Trophies in Honor of - The Board reviewed a memo recommending a modification to policy that would allow trophies to be donated in honor of living dogs and living people. The current Board policy states:

 

IV. Ribbons/Prizes

B. In honor of

1) Trophies may be offered in memory of deceased dogs or people.

2) Trophies may be offered in honor of a living person or dog.

 

This policy has been in place for more than 45 years. The idea was that an actively competing dog or exhibitor should not be honored with a trophy, as it could possibly give them a competitive advantage and they could even compete for the trophy named in their honor. The recommendation is to modify the policy to allow trophies to be donated in honor or living dogs or people.

 

IV. Ribbons/Prizes

B. In honor of

1) Trophies may only be offered in memory of deceased dogs or people.

2) Trophies may be offered in memory of deceased persons or in honor of a living person or dog who is no longer an active breeder or exhibitor.

 

This recommendation is a change to Board Policy and may be made by a vote of the Board. If approved, this change would become effective immediately. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

Monitoring All-Breed Events Offering the NOHS - The staff provided on update on the number of all-breed events offering the AKC Nation Owner-Handled Series (NOHS). Currently 67% of all-breed events offer the NOHS.

 

Add Trick Dog Testing to Standing Approval of Special Attractions - The Board reviewed a staff recommendation to add Trick Dog Testing to the list of Special Attractions with standing approval. At the July 2013 Board Meeting, the Board established standing approval for certain special attractions that would require no review and be automatically approved. Event Operations is recommending that Trick Dog testing be added to the preapproved special attraction list. Without objection, the Event Operations Staff will grant standing approval for Trick Dog Special Attractions. There was no objection.

 

CLUBS Reducing Sanctioned Match Program for Local Specialty Clubs - The Sports and Events staff is recommending a change to policy, which would reduce the number of sanctioned matches specialty clubs would be required to hold before being considered for approval to hold a licensed show. Current policy requires local specialty clubs to hold two Plan B matches at least six months apart, then submit a presentation for advancement to the Plan A level, then hold two Plan A matches at least six months apart, then submit another presentation prior to obtaining licensed status. The recommendation is to reduce the sanctioning process to one Plan B match, one Plan A match, then a presentation prior to obtaining licensed status. The recommendation in essence cuts the sanctioning process by 50%. This will be discussed further at the November Board meeting.

 

JUDGING OPERATIONS - Conformation Judging Statistics - The Judging Operation Staff presented the Board with statistics related to the number of conformation judging applications (New Breed and Additional Breed applicants) considered by the Judges Review Committee in the following three months. It was VOTED to adjourn Tuesday, Oct 10th at 12:02p.m.

 


Appendix A

HERDING REGULATIONS

New Chapter - Chapter VIII

 

Section 1. Course D.

Course D reflects the day to day control and management of livestock in a varied ranch, farm and/or stockyard setting. The dog should demonstrate instinct, ability, versatility and training as an effective stock dog and working partner with the handler while controlling and moving livestock calmly and efficiently through a given course.
Course D provides for a combination of obstacles commonly applied in a ranch setting incorporating areas in and around the herding facility. All elements cannot be restricted to a single arena and must include a combination of arena, pen, and pasture/field work. While the obstacle types are constant, the actual course will vary from facility to facility as designed by the course director. The course should provide for access and clear viewing for the judge at all times.

 

Sheep are used on Course D. Type of stock available for each class must be stated in the Premium List.
Each run will be allotted a minimum of 10 head of stock for every scored section, with larger numbers preferred (Fewer than 10 heads may be involved in a component within a scored section, for example, where sorting or gate work is done).

 

Course D represents a unique combination and order of obstacles tailored to each host facility. The course(s) for each event and class will not be available until one hour before the start of the event, and at such time will be posted by the Event Secretary. Each course is designed by the Trial Committee’s Course Director. However the Judge shall have final authority over course design, provided any modifications are applied 90 minutes prior to the start of the first Course D class to allow sufficient time for the posting of the course layout. Alternatively, the Course Director may communicate with the judge prior to the event to coordinate for optimal course design.

 

The type of obstacles to be used for the Course D must be included in the Premium List.

 

All stock must be accustomed to being worked by dogs on the designated course and be conditioned prior to the trial.

 

No electric stock prods will be permitted to be used on the trial stock before or during the trial on the day of the trial.
The club must ensure that facilities are provided for the separation of fresh and exhausted stock. Stock will be sorted by gate run or into groups primarily on the basis of uniformity, and used in the prescribed groups throughout the trial; these groups will be run in a pre-determined order, except that groups may be deleted from the run order or individual animals may be substituted within groups where a group member is found to be unsound or otherwise unfit for use.

 

Selection of particular stock for a particular competitor will constitute misconduct and will be grounds for a formal complaint.

 

Priority must always be given to care of livestock.

 

Trial schedules should be adjusted to provide adequate breaks for livestock as necessary. The trial hosting club is responsible for ensuring an adequate number of livestock has been hired for the number of runs at their trial. Regardless of the type of stock used, clubs must arrange to have additional stock in reserve.

 

At the discretion of the Course Director, one or more dogs may be used to facilitate stock handling, provided that they do not interfere with livestock behavior during judging. A dog competing in that weekend’s trial events may not be used for stock handling until after it has completed its final run for the day.

 

Section 2. Course Director.

The trial-host club must appoint a Course Director, whose duties are to design and construct or supervise the construction of the course or courses; to assist and advise in all matters pertaining to the courses and the running of same; and to supervise the care of the trial stock during the running of the trial. The Course Director or stewards will be responsible for keeping all competing dogs that are not on course or in the ready position from disturbing livestock, contestants, spectators or dogs that are on course and being judged. The Trial Committee and the Course Director will be responsible for ensuring that all non-competing dogs except stock handler’s dogs are barred from the immediate run area. The Course Director may appoint one or more Course Stewards to assist him/her.

 

Course D will not be confined to an arena, but should encompass a group of locations depending on the specific course design. There must be a perimeter fence or other natural barrier containing the trial area, but this need not coincide with the course boundaries. The minimum size of the course must be no less than 2 1/2 acres or 108,000 sq. ft.

 

Section 3. Pens & Obstacles.

The take pen must be a minimum 12 feet by 12 feet. The exhaust pen may be the same pen as the take pen. If the exhaust is a separate pen, it must be large enough to accommodate the number of stock being used. The take and exhaust pens must have a gate that latches and swings easily.

 

Gate widths must be sufficient to accommodate stock movement without undue risk of stock contact with the gate or gateposts.

 

For Course D trials the freestanding pen will have a 6 foot rope firmly affixed to the gate and hung loosely on the pen to keep the gate closed.

 

Fence line obstacles in all levels must consist of a section of fencing, a fence panel, or an object such as a barrel placed so that the stock must go:

 

(a) Through an opening in the obstacle; or (b) Between the obstacle and the arena fence. The opening for stock to negotiate in all fence line obstacles or between the fence line obstacle and the arena wall must be 8 ft.

 

Freestanding obstacles: The opening for stock to negotiate in all freestanding chutes must be 14 ft. to 16 ft. wide.
Trailers, chutes, footbaths, bridges and stalls etc. must be of sufficient size to safely accommodate the stock, dog and handler as required. If other obstacles are used, i.e., trees, bushes, boulders, tractors, hay wagons, round bales of straw etc., sufficient space should be available for safe passage of the stock, dog and handler as required.
All obstacles shall be a minimum height of 3 ft.

 

Section 4. Course Design & Safety.

The course design for each level shall be decided upon by the Course Director, approved by the judge, and posted one hour before the start of the trial.

 

Before the trial, the Course Director and his stewards will ensure that the trial grounds are cleared of all litter and dangerous objects such as broken glass, loose wire, etc. and they shall inspect all obstacles and fences to be used in the trial to ensure that they are sturdy and safe with no nail projecting, broken boards, etc., that might cause injury to livestock, dogs, or competitors.

 

Where natural hazards (e.g. thorned vegetation, wasps) on the site are known to exist and be consequential, the nature of these known hazards should be disclosed to competitors before the trial begins.

 

Livestock guardian dogs should be secured, preferably out of visual range while visiting dogs are on the trial site.

 

It is the responsibility of the Course Director, the judge, and the exhibitor to ensure the safety of the course.

 

Stock - Sheep/goats used in AKC Course D trials must be lambs, wethers or ewes, and in the case of wool sheep over 1 year of age, must have been shorn within the past year.

 

People attending to sheep should know how to properly handle them under the jaw or by the flank, and how to hold them under the jaw for restraint or controlled movement.

 

The proper use of a crook, by a competent operator, is also an acceptable catching method.

 

Sheep should never be caught by grabbing their fleece.

 

Sheep must never be lifted by the head, ears, horns, tail or fleece.

 

Section 5. Trial Levels.

The levels at a Course D trial shall be Started, Intermediate and Advanced. An owner may enter a dog in any trial level he or she deems appropriate; however, once that dog has acquired a qualifying score in such level at a licensed or member trial, it shall be ineligible to be entered in any lower level.

 

A Course D trial need not include all levels, but in order to hold an Intermediate level the trial must include the Started level. If an Advanced level is offered, Intermediate and Started levels must also be offered at licensed and member club trials. A dog will remain eligible to compete in levels for both Course D Started and Course D Intermediate for 60 days when according to the owner’s records the dog has completed the requirements to be awarded an AKC Excellent title at that trial level. Dogs that have achieved any title of Course D advanced (HXD) are eligible to compete in Course D advanced (HXD) class for an indefinite period of time.

 

Section 6. Qualifying Scores.

A qualifying score shall be 60 or more points (per Chapter IV, Section 2) with no incomplete sections in all classes.
A qualifying score must never be awarded unless the run is completed "on course". For a run to be "on course", all stock must leave the take pen, and each required element of the course must be completed before the next required element may be considered. This includes entire distance of the HI & HX drive.

 

If a handler attempts a course element out of the correct sequence, the judge may notify the handler that the run is off course. However, such notification must be done in a consistent manner for all handlers.

 

In the case of obstacles, completion of the element requires that at ALL stock pass completely through or in the obstacle in the required direction.

 

A hold must be attempted before the re-pen and the score will reflect the quality of the hold or attempt. The dog need not be between the handler and the stock, as long as stock are viewed as being held off the pen so as to prevent crowding at the exhaust pen gate as it is being opened.

 

Completion of a run “on course” requires penning of all stock before the handler closes the exhaust pen gate and completing the sorting of all stock as specified for that course.

 

Section 7. Course D General Requirements.

For a D Course Trial, each required element will occur in its own scored section of the course subject to possible modification by the judge. Scoring is for the actual element, which is marked approximately 20 feet before the element and ending as the stock exit. The remainder of the scoring i9s under the Stock Control section of the score sheet.

 

The Judge and/or Course Director will determine the time allotted for the course. Before a trial, the course should be tested with livestock similar to the trial stock, and the test should be timed.

 

This testing and timing should be done sufficiently early to enable any appropriate changes in the course before the course design is posted. All elements must have increasing degrees of difficulty for each level.

 

Course D Required Elements

All levels must include all seven (7) Required Elements and each dog much complete these elements in a satisfactory manner to quality:

* Outrun – Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that demonstrates no crossovers and completes the outrun or gather as close to the balance point as possible …………(8 points)

* Lift - Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that performing a calm lift at the correct speed and direction without upsetting the stock.(4 points)

* Fetch - Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that fetches the stock straight to the handler at a steady pace working at the proper balance point. (8 points)

* Fetch and/or Drive - The stock will be moved through the course in a straight line between elements or designated destinations - Maximum points will be awarded for demonstrating a calm fetch and/or drive in a straight line or lines through the designated parts of the course. (20 points)

* Take pen - The take pen may be a stall in a barn, a fence line pen or a freestanding pen. Maximum points will be awarded for the stock leaving the pen calmly and in control. (10 points)

* Freestanding obstacle - The freestanding obstacle may be anywhere on the course, but at least 12 feet from any fence line. Maximum points will be awarded for negotiating all stock calmly and in control through the obstacle unassisted by the handler, on the first attempt. (10 points)

* Exhaust pen - The exhaust pen may be a fence line pen or a stall in a barn. A hold should be demonstrated before penning the stock. Maximum points will be awarded for penning all stock in a calm manner. The dog and handler may be required to remain outside the pen. (10 points)

 

Course D Optional Elements

All levels must include three (3) Optional Elements and each dog much complete these elements in a satisfactory manner to quality:

 

Optional Elements may be the same for all levels, or course design may use different elements for each level. Each optional Element shall be assigned 10 points:

 

Load & unload chute - Chutes must not have solid sides and a gate on the closed end. They may vary from 3 to 6 feet in width and may or may not have a floor. Chutes may be configured in a variety of shapes including straight, “L”, or “Y”. Chutes may have entry wings with a width of no more than 12 feet. Stock enters the opening, and is let out through the gate on the other end.

 

Degree of difficulty between levels will be determined by: Started handlers are unlimited in their movement. Intermediate handlers may go to the wing or entrance. Advanced handlers must remain 10’ from any part of the chute until they open the gate. Maximum points will be awarded for calmly and efficiently loading and unloading all the stock.

 

a) Sort Chute – Two or more stock will be sorted into pens or stalls. Dog will hold stock in alleyway while handler works the gate. Handler may touch sheep lightly with no abuse to equipment or livestock. Maximum points will be awarded for efficiency and calm handling of the stock. Degree of difficulty between levels will be determined by: At the Started level, any stock may be sorted; at the Intermediate and Advanced levels specific stock (marked stock) must be sorted. Maximum points will be awarded for sorting the correct stock in a calm and efficient
manner. Stock may be marked with ribbons, or similar non harmful identification applied to designate select stock for sorting.

 

b) Bridge - A bridge may be an actual existing bridge or an obstacle set up for the course. In the latter case, an obstacle designated as a “bridge” is distinguished from a chute in that the bridge has a floor and should be no less than 6 feet in length and no more than 12 feet in width. Actual bridges may have any surface and may be narrower than 8 feet but no less than 4 feet in width. Maximum points will be awarded for calmly and efficiently moving all the stock over the bridge on the first attempt. Degree of difficulty between levels may be determined by one of two methods: Started - 2 wings; Intermediate – 1 wing; Advanced - no wings or handler positioning restrictions for each level.

 

c) Gate work - Gate work should encompass adding or removing stock from one group to another from adjoining areas. At the Started level, any stock may be sorted, while at the Intermediate and Advanced levels specific stock (marked stock) should be sorted. Maximum points will be awarded for sorting the correct stock in a calm and efficient manner. Stock may be marked with ribbons, or similar non harmful identification applied to designate select stock for sorting.

 

d) Extra obstacles - Extra obstacles may include trees, bushes, rocks, farm equipment, and bales of hay or straw, etc. to either pass between as panels or to make turns around. Maximum points will be awarded for calmly putting all the stock through or around the obstacle on the first attempt.

 

e) Figure 8 - The stock must move in a figure eight pattern Cones, barrels or natural objects may be used to set out the pattern and the stock must pass through the center three times to complete the pattern. Started handlers may move anywhere; Intermediate must stand centered between the markers; Advanced handlers must remain stationary outside the figure 8. Maximum points will be awarded for calmly and efficiently moving all the stock around the pattern.

 

f) Mock footbath – The handler and dog must move stock through a footbath containing only water. Absolutely no chemicals may be used in the footbath. The footbath should be from 2 to 4 feet in width, but large enough for the stock to move comfortably through. Maximum points will be awarded for calmly and efficiently putting stock through the footbath on the first attempt. Degree of difficulty between levels may be determined by: Started - a minimum of 1/3 of the flock into bath, Intermediate a minimum 2/3 of the flock into bath, and advanced all stock into foot bath.

 

g) Stock Trailer - The trailer should be of a suitable size to ensure the safety of the stock and the dog. The stock must be loaded into the trailer without the dog entering the trailer. Once the stock has entered the trailer, the trailer door will be closed. The dog may enter the trailer to unload the stock. Maximum points will be awarded for calmly and efficiently moving all the stock in and out of the trailer on the first attempt. Degree of difficulty between levels may be determined in one of the following:

•Started to load trailer to 1/3 of its capacity. Intermediate to load trailer to 2/3 of its capacity. Advanced to load trailer to full capacity. Or;

•Started handlers may enter trailer while loading. Intermediate handlers may stand in opening of trailer. Advanced handlers must remain outside during loading.

 

h) Alleyways – 2 panels of sufficient length are set approximately 15 – 25 feet parallel from the perimeter Fence line, with a distance of approximately 10 to 16 feet apart, to simulate an alleyway with an open gate on one side. Started handlers may walk through the alleyway with the gate closed. Intermediate handlers may not walk through, and dogs need to get the sheep through the alleyway not allowing the stock to go through the ‘open’ gate. Advanced handlers may not walk through, but must turn the stock to go through the side gate. Alternatively, a Maltese could be used using similar criteria to differentiate levels.

 

i) Shed/hold – Started handlers will hold the stock in a designated area that must be away from any fence line. Intermediate handlers will follow all of the same shedding criteria as Advanced, except that they may use a fence line. Advanced handlers must remain in the designated shedding ring. The stock must be split into two groups by the combined efforts of the dog and handler. When the handler calls the dog in to take control, the dog must come immediately, and turn the group indicated by the handler away from the remaining stock. If the dog does not come
in when the handler asks, it will be considered a failed attempt and points will be deducted at the judge’s discretion. The stock must be moved away from the remaining stock and held until the judge indicates that the shed is complete. Maximum points will be awarded for a successful shed on the first attempt.

 

j) Freestanding pen with rope – The pen shall be between eight feet by eight feet (8’ x 8’) and twelve feet x twelve feet (12’ x 12’). A 6 foot (6’) rope must be firmly affixed to the gate and hung loosely on the pen to keep the gate closed. When ready to pen the stock, the handler must open the gate, and after all the stock are penned, the handler must close the gate. However, after penning, the handler and/or the dog may enter the pen to exhaust the stock. Upon completion of penning, the rope will be loosely hung over the pen. Maximum points will be awarded for
penning and exhausting the stock efficiently. Degree of difficulty between levels may be determined by the following:

•Started handlers do not have to hold onto the rope and may enter the pen.

•Intermediate handlers do not have to hold onto the rope and may not enter the pen.

•Advanced handlers must hold onto the rope and may not enter the pen.

 

(l) Stock Setting - Dog will set stock for an un entered dog. Dog will take stock to a designated area and allow an un-entered dog to pick them up. Maximum points will be awarded for the dog who allows pick up the stock with minimal commands. Degree of difficulty may be determined by the size of the area that the stock is set out in or by competitor dog being on lead for Started, dragging lead for Intermediate or off-lead for Advanced.

 

Section 8. Levels.

Started Level Course D—Description

The D course Started course consists of the 7 general elements, namely a take pen, gather, lift, fetch, exhaust pen, freestanding obstacle and fetch and/or drive plus three of the optional elements. The Course Director will set the required elements in any order.

 

The judge or Course Director may designate certain obstacles that the handler may not walk through, as appropriate for this level.

 

In order to qualify for a leg at the Course D Started level, a dog must perform the following elements in a satisfactory manner, in the order that the Course Director has set out:

 

Gather - The dog will be at a distance of at least 60 feet from the stock. The handler may move to a position between the dog and the stock, but not closer than 15 feet from the stock. Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that demonstrates no crossovers, and completes the gather as near the balance point as circumstances allow (8 points)

 

Lift - Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that performing a calm lift at the correct speed and direction without upsetting the stock (4 points)

 

Fetch - Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that fetches the stock straight to the handler at a steady pace working at the proper balance point (8 points)

 

Fetch and / or Drive – Scoring encompasses all the work between the exit of an element and 20 feet from the beginning of the next element. Maximum points will be awarded for the dog demonstrating steady movement of the stock in a straight line while working at the correct balance point through the designated part of the element (20 points)

 

Take stock out of pen - All stock must leave the take pen. Maximum points will be awarded for stock leaving the pen calmly and the dog maintaining control of the livestock while the handler is closing the gate (10 points)

 

Freestanding obstacle - Maximum points will be awarded for negotiating all stock calmly and in control through the obstacle, unassisted by the handler, on the first attempt (10 points)

 

Exhaust pen - The exhaust pen may be a fence line pen or a stall in a barn. A hold should be demonstrated before penning the stock, but it is not necessary to hold them while the gate is open. Maximum points will be awarded for stock walking into the pen. (10 points)

 

Additional Elements – The Course Director will select three additional elements.

 

Intermediate Level Course D—Description

The Course D Intermediate course consists of the 7 general elements namely a take pen, outrun, lift, fetch, exhaust pen, freestanding obstacle, drive plus three of the optional elements listed The Course Director will set the required elements in any order.

 

The judge or Course Director may designate certain obstacles that the handler may not walk through, as appropriate for this level.

 

In order to qualify for a leg at the Course D Intermediate level, a dog must perform the following elements in a satisfactory manner, in the order that the Course Director has set out:

 

Outrun - The dog will be at a distance of at least 100 feet from the stock. The handler may move to a position between the dog and the stock, but not closer than 50 feet from the stock. Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that demonstrates no crossovers, and completes the gather as near the balance point as circumstances allow (8 points)

 

Lift - Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that performs a calm lift without upsetting the stock (4 points)

 

Fetch - Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that fetches the stock to the handler at a steady pace working at the correct balance point. (8 points)

 

Fetch and/or Drive - Scoring encompasses all the work between the exit of an element and 20 feet from the beginning of the next element. The Course Director will designate a drive area, bearing in mind the draws. The drive distance will be a minimum of 75 feet. The handler must be at least15 feet behind the dog during the drive. The entire 75’ must be completed to be considered on-course. Maximum points will be awarded for the dog demonstrating steady movement of the stock in a straight line while working at the correct balance point through the designated part of the element (20 points)

 

Take stock out of pen - All stock must leave the take pen. It is preferred that the dog enters the take pen and calmly removes all of the stock. Maximum points will be awarded for stock leaving the pen calmly and the dog maintaining control of the livestock while the handler is closing the gate. At the judge’s discretion, points may be deducted for the handler entering the take pen (10 points)

 

Freestanding obstacle - Maximum points will be awarded for negotiating all stock calmly and in control through the obstacle, unassisted by the handler, on the first attempt (10 points)

 

Exhaust pen - The exhaust pen may be a fence line pen or a stall in a barn. A hold should be demonstrated while the handler is opening the gate. Maximum points will be awarded for the livestock walking into the pen (10 points)

 

Additional Elements – The Course Director will select three additional elements.

Advanced Level Course D—Description

The Course D Advanced course consists of the 7 general elements namely a take pen, outrun, lift, fetch, exhaust pen, freestanding obstacle, drive plus three of the optional elements from listed. The Course Director will set the required elements in any order.

 

The judge or Course Director may designate certain obstacles that the handler may not walk through, as appropriate for this level.

 

In order to qualify for a leg at the Course D advanced level, a dog must perform the following elements in a satisfactory manner, in the order that the Course Director has set out:

 

Outrun - The dog will be at a distance of at least 220 feet from the stock. The handler must stand at the post and send the dog from that point. Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that demonstrates no crossovers, and completes the gather as near the balance point as circumstances allow (8 points)

 

Lift - Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that performing a calm lift at the correct speed and direction without upsetting the stock (4 points)

 

Fetch - Maximum points will be awarded for the dog that fetches the stock to the handler at a steady pace working at the correct balance point (8 points)

 

Fetch and/or Drive - Scoring encompasses all the work between the exit of an element and 20 feet from the beginning of the next element. The Course Director will designate a drive area, bearing in mind the draws. The line of the drive will be at least 30 feet from any parallel fence, and the drive distance will be a minimum of 125 feet. The handler must remain stationary during the drive. The entire 125’ must be completed to be considered on-course. Maximum points will be awarded for the dog demonstrating steady movement of the stock in a straight line while working at the correct balance point through the designated part of the element (20 points)

 

Take stock out of pen - All stock must leave the take pen. It is preferred that the dog enters the take pen and calmly removes all of the stock. Maximum points will be awarded for stock leaving the pen calmly and the dog maintaining control of the livestock while the handler is closing the gate. At the judge’s discretion, points may be deducted for the handler entering the take pen (10 points)

 

Freestanding obstacle - Maximum points will be awarded for negotiating all stock calmly and in control through the obstacle, unassisted by the handler, on the first attempt (10 points)

 

Exhaust pen - The exhaust pen may be a fence line pen or a stall in a barn. A hold should be demonstrated with the gate open before penning the stock. Maximum points will be awarded for the stock walking into the exhaust pen (10 points)

 

Additional Elements – The Course Director will select three additional elements.

 

Section 9. Judging Course D.

Points will be deducted in 1/2 point or whole point increments only.

 

SUGGESTED SCORING:

A. Outrun/Lift/Fetch:

1. Up to 1 1/2 points deducted for a redirect while the dog is in motion.

2. Up to 3 points deducted for a stop and redirect.

3. Up to 10 points deducted if the handler leaves the handler’s post prematurely.

4. Up to 10 points deducted for a crossover between the handler and the stock on the outrun.

5. Up to 5 points deducted if the dog starts straight ahead towards the stock and then completes the outrun correctly.

6. Up to 10 points deducted if the dog runs straight up the middle on the outrun.

7. Up to 20 points deducted if (caused by the dog) the stock run down the course out of control.

8. Up to 5 points deducted for dog crossing behind the handler on the outrun.

 

B. Drive/Fetch: Note: Applies to movement of the stock over the entire course. Penalty is to be deducted under the exercise(s) where the error(s) occurs. The correct path of the livestock through the course will be a zone approximately 12 feet wide, or 12 feet in from the fence line.

1. Up to 1 point deducted each time for flanking the dog too far off the stock.

2. Up to 1 point deducted each time for the dog allowing the stock to spread out.

3. Up to 1 point deducted each time for causing the stock to weave by over-flanking.

4. Up to 2 points deducted each time the dog circles the stock.

5. Up to 3 points deducted each time the stock (one or more) are off-line.

6. Up to 3 points deducted each time for the dog allowing or causing the stock to split.

7. Up to 3 points deducted for retreating on the course.

8. Up to 3 points deducted for the dog leaving the stock due to lack of interest or off contact.

 

C. Obstacles: Retries are permitted at all obstacles. No obstacle may be attempted more than twice. After two tries, the stock are moved to the designated distance that marks the beginning of the next obstacle. It will be counted as an attempt if the stock run past the obstacle.

1. Up to 1 point per head deducted for each attempt at an obstacle which is missed.

2. Up to 1 point per head deducted for the dog bringing the stock back through an obstacle from the wrong direction.

3. Up to 1 point per head deducted on the Hold/Exam pen for each head of stock leaving the pen before the Judge’s signal to exit. The stock may leave in single file or as a group after the Judge’s signal.

4. Up to 7 points deducted if the handler crosses over the opening of the Hold/Exam pen or moves behind the pen before the Judge signals a hold.

5. Up to 2 points deducted for handler forgetting to close the exhaust pen gate.

6. Up to 3 points deducted if the dog loses control of the stock while the handler opens the exhaust pen gate.

7. Up to 5 points deducted if the dog brings the stock back out of the exhaust pen.

8. Up to 5 points deducted if the dog voluntarily leaves the stock and accompanies the handler to the exhaust pen gate.

9. Non-qualifying if the handler walks through an obstacle.

 

D. General Deductions:

 1. Up to 1 point deducted each time for the dog stopping and sniffing.

 2. Up to 3 points deducted for excessive commands.

 3. Up to 3 points deducted each time the dog refuses to obey commands.

 4. Up to 3 points deducted for the handler moving the stock.

 5. Up to 5 points deducted each time the handler touches the dog or the stock.

 6. Up to 5 points deducted or removed for unacceptable grip. Dog must be removed for second unacceptable grip or excused for abusive grip.

 7. Up to 5 points deducted each time the dog fouls the course.

 8. Up to 5 points deducted if, when entering the arena (or working area), the dog remains on lead as the handler leaves the gate area to proceed to the appropriate post or if, when leaving the arena (working area), the lead is applied early rather than just prior to opening the gate to leave the arena or working area.

 9. Up to 3 points deducted, each incident, for the excessive or threatening use of the crook or stock stick, or use of threats causing dog to cringe.

10. If the stock simply follows the handler through the course, or if the dog simply heels or follows off contact through the course, the dog must not qualify.

11. Up to 8 points deducted if stock does not respect dog.

12. Up to 10 points deducted if the dog needs repeated commands to perform tasks.

13. Up to 10 points deducted if the dog fails to control situations on its own initiative.

 

In order to receive a qualifying score in any level, a dog must have a total of at least 60 points, provided none of the above point categories are scored at less than 1/2 of the available points.

 

Reinstated Judge: Mr. John Brading

Resigned Judges: Mrs. Norma C. Baley, Mr. David Behrens, Mr. George D. Boulton, Ms. Sherry S. Caldwell, Mrs. Ann Harris-Chaffin, Mrs. Barbara L. Kalbach, Mrs. Charlotte Laning, Ms. Annita Darlene Mantei, Mrs. Nash Parker, Mrs. Lillian L. Tiffany, Mrs. Rachel Rehberg Gongre, Ms. Debbie Nierman, Mrs. Margaret B. Stanski, Mr. John Waldrop

Emeritus Judges: Mrs. Jeannine E. Adams, Mrs. Dolores Arste, Mr. Leon A. Breault, Mrs. Barbara A. Gomez, Mr. Clinton M. Harris, Mrs. Georgia Harris, Mr. Lyle M. Harstad, Mr. Russell Kaufman, Mr. Robert K. Lentz, Mrs. Dorothy F. Martin, Mr. Edward A. Martin, Mrs. Sylvia K. Reitman, Mrs. Mona Simmons, Mr. Eugene Singer, Mrs. Dawnetta Fields, Mr. Stephen Jewell, Mrs. Jacquelyn Klein, Mrs. Wingate Mackay-Smith, Mrs. Diane L. Malenfant, Ms. Maryle Malloy

Deceased Judges: Mrs. Marilyn Burdett, Mrs. Jane Fox, Mr. J. Johnson, Dr. Charles Kitchell, Mr. Ronald Lambert, Mrs. Betty A. Radezevich, Mr. Richard Samide, Mr. Don Smith, Mr. Eugene Tomlinson, Jr., Mr. Barry M. Tompkins, Mrs. Sheila R. Balch, Ms. Janice Sparhawk Gardner, Ms. Martha Ramer, Mr. Charles C. Scott, Mr. James R. White, Mr. Clyde Wilkinson

1709 http://www.thedogpress.com/AKC/1710-Minutes.asp

 

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