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 AKC Board Minutes,Chairman's Report

AKC Board Meeting Minutes

Meeting held November 13th-14th, 2017 (AKC Published 11/29/2017)

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There was of course, an Executive Session, but The American Kennel Club Board Actions for November are listed in it's entirety below.

 

To search for specific subject, person, or word in the American Kennel Club minutes, use (Ctrl F) "find" command. Wording is exactly as presented in the Minutes provided by American Kennel Club Secretary James Crowley, with addition of bolded subject text.


 

The Board convened on Monday, November 13, 2017 at 8:00 a.m. All Directors were present except for Harvey Wooding. Also present was the Executive Secretary.

 

The October 2017 Board minutes, copies of which were provided to all Directors, were discussed. Upon a motion by Ms. Biddle, seconded by Dr. Davies, the October 2017 minutes were unanimously approved as amended (absent: Mr. Wooding).

 

EXECUTIVE SESSION - There was an EXECUTIVE SESSION at the beginning of the meeting to discuss sensitive business matters. There was nothing reported out of this session.

 

CHAIRMAN’S COMMITTEE ON THE JUDGING APPROVAL PROCESS - The Chair, at the July 2017 meeting of the Board of Directors established a committee to review the current Board-approved Judging Approval Process adopted by the Board at its June 2015 meeting, and effective September 1, 2015. The Committee was asked to determine where modifications may be warranted.

 

In keeping with the stated intention of an “evolutionary process”, the committee identified several aspects in which it felt demanded immediate attention in its initial recommendations:

 

1. The rate of advancement.

2. CEU (Component Educational Units) experiences and values.

3. The role of the Executive Field Staff.

 

The results of the Committee’s review were presented to the Board.  Each of the above covered topics within the policy are interconnected and thus modifications were needed to many areas of the policy. While the recommendations to modify may appear to be quite expansive, they were necessary to ensure consistency throughout. The committee was one in its conviction that the AKC’s process to approve its judges must weigh the considerations of not just the judging community, but its breeders and exhibitors as well. The committee was confident the revisions recommended would provide a clear and defined path for approval, while instilling faith that those approved to judge are sufficiently prepared, and preserving the mission statement of the AKC.  The Board expressed its gratitude to Mr. Bivin and Mr. Sabella for all of their time and offered deep appreciation for the positive contributions that they made. The Board also thanked Mr. Thomas for his outstanding work in this effort.  Following a motion from Ms. Cruz, seconded by Mr. Powers, the Board VOTED (affirmative: Ms. Biddle, Mr. Carota, Ms. Cruz, Dr. Davies, Mr. Dok, Mr. Feeney, Ms. McAteer, Mr. Menaker, Mr. Powers, Ms. Wallin; opposed: Dr. Battaglia, Dr. Garvin; absent: Mr. Wooding) to consider the matter at this meeting waiving its normal notice procedures.  Following a motion by Ms. Cruz, seconded by Mr. Powers, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent: Mr. Wooding) to approve the recommended modifications to the Judges Approval Process effective January 1, 2018. Effective immediately there is a moratorium on all new judging applications for additional breeds until the effective date of the new Policy. Applications in processing or post-marked prior to this notice will continue through processing.

SEE ATTACHMENT A FOR REVISED JUDGING APPROVAL PROCESS


PRESIDENT’S REPORT - Board Action Items - Mr. Sprung reviewed Action Items, and reported on Staff initiatives. Mr. Sprung gave an update on the North Carolina office lease negotiations and reported on the status of the plans to move the AKC’s New York offices and AKC Museum of the Dog to 101 Park Avenue. Everything is currently going according to plan and schedule.

 

Information about Lowest Sixty Breeds Registered - Dr. Battaglia gave an extensive presentation on rank order of litters and dogs registered and emphasized those for the lowest 60 AKC registered breeds.  The study focused on four major factors thought to be related to a breed’s risk for “extinction” from the Sport of Conformation. There was discussion concerning how AKC could help to encourage those with a vested interest in these breeds, including the breeders. The focus would be to increase the number of individual dogs registered from AKC litters and to increase the entries of low entry breeds that are exhibited in AKC’s events. Statistical information was provided on litter registrations, individual registrations by breed, limited registration percentages by breed, plus overall direction of the breeds’ AKC population size and number of show entries. The question raised from the data is why so many Americans who own a purebred dog choose not to breed them, belong to a breed club and not breed using a breed standard. The trends show that there is a possibility that 60 AKC breeds will become “extinct from the show ring” if something is not done to increase the number of litters and dogs from these breeds. The ripple effect is impacting the number of dogs that are being registered, the number of dogs eligible for conformation events, and the number of people who compete in AKC conformation.

 

The recommendations in the presentation were for staff to reach out to the stakeholders, including Parent Clubs, for input addressing the future of the bottom sixty breeds and for the exploration of a National Sweepstakes Ranking System that would recognize the top sires and dams in each breed. Sires and Dams would earn points based on their offspring’s placements at selected AKC conformation events.

 

Legal Status Report - Jay Waks, Senior Executive Vice President and General Counsel and Heather McManus, Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, presented a status report on pending litigation and other Legal activities for the months of September and October 2017.

 

FINANCE - Joseph Baffuto, CFO, presented AKC’s unaudited financial results through the October 31, 2017. Total revenues of $59.1 million were 1.5% above budget and 9.5% greater than 2016. Dog Registrations’ volume of 475,288 was 2% above budget and 7% higher than 2016, along with Total Litters processed of 198,696 being 2% above budget and 7% higher than last year as well. Total operating expenses of $54.2 million were 7% below budget, but 10.8% higher than 2016. YTD Operating income of $4.8 million has significantly exceeded the breakeven budget for the ten-month period, but is slightly below the prior year’s recorded actual operating income of $5.0 million. Our investment portfolio reflects unrealized gains on investments totaling $10.0 million year to date, which combined with operating income reflects AKC as a total net income of $14.8 million at October 31, 2017.

 

Goldman Sachs Presentation - Zachary Cuttler, and Cristin M. Dalecki, Vice Presidents, Investment Management Division from Goldman Sachs presented a year to date report on the performance of the AKC Assets that are under its management. There was a review of overall asset allocations and details of the portfolio were discussed. The Portfolio is up 7.5% through September.

 

Spinone Italiano Proposed Breed Standard Revisions - The Board reviewed proposed Breed standard revisions to the Spinone Italiano Breed Standard as submitted by the Spinone Club of America, Inc. (SCA). The standard was last approved when the breed was recognized with an effective date of September 28, 2000. Following a motion by Dr. Garvin, seconded by Dr. Battaglia, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent: Mr. Wooding) to approve the proposed breed standard for publication for comment in the Secretary’s Page of the AKC Gazette.

 

Boykin Spaniel Proposed Breed Standard Revisions - The Board reviewed proposed Breed standard revisions to the Boykin Spaniel breed standard as submitted by the Boykin Spaniel Club & Breeders Association of America (BSCBAA).  The Boykin Spaniel breed standard was last approved when the breed advanced to the Miscellaneous Class with an effective date of January 1, 2008. Following a motion by Dr. Garvin, seconded by Dr. Battaglia, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent: Mr. Wooding) to approve the proposed breed standard for publication for comment in the Secretary’s Page of the AKC Gazette.

 

Commercial Filming of Events Contractual and “Limited Use” Policy - The Board had adopted a Commercial Filming at Events Contractual Policy on April 12, 2005, and amended it in August 2016. Further, the Board adopted a Commercial Filming at Events Operational Policy on June 22, 2005. The operational policy sets guidelines for camera crews to film at events. The policy specifically does not require editorial news coverage filming to be published or coordinated with AKC, although the event chairman must give permission. Following a motion by Dr. Garvin and seconded by Mr. Dok the Board VOTED unanimously (absent; Mr. Wooding) to approve an updated Commercial Filming of Events Contractual Policy (which includes a “Limited Use” policy effective December 1, 2017.

 

The Commercial Filming at Events Operational Policy and its editorial news coverage policy, remain the same.
Commercial Filming at Events Contractual Policy (April 12, 2005 Board Meeting, Amended at August 2016 Board Meeting, Amended at the November 2017 Board Meeting) Effective December 1, 2017

 

All rights to the commercial filming, electronic transmission, broadcast, distribution of images and exploitation of all events held under AKC rules are owned by AKC (“commercial filming and/or electronic transmission”). AKC has the unlimited, irrevocable access, right and authority to film, record, photograph, videotape, livestream, and/or broadcast at all events and each of them.

 

Any club that contemplates commercial filming and/or electronic transmission of its event must contact AKC Productions and cooperate with AKC sufficiently in advance of the proposed agreement negotiations and must include AKC in the negotiation of and as a party to the contract for commercial filming and/or electronic transmission. The club has the right to seek its own professional representation of the club’s interests, at its discretion and expense. When a club makes application to AKC for permission to hold its event, it must include in that application a declaration as to whether or not its event will or will not be commercially filmed and/or electronically transmitted.
The following are mandatory contractual requirements that must be included in each contract with a third party that is engaged in the commercial filming and/or electronic transmission of events held under AKC rules. The following also applies to all clubs filming and/or electronically transmitting events held under AKC rules. In the first instance, each club is responsible itself for enforcing these requirements and informing the AKC of violations, and the clubs are prohibited from entering into any contract or other arrangement which would violate these requirements.

 

The following requirements must be fulfilled in connection with all new contracts following the date which is the later of (i) the adoption of these requirements by the Board of Directors, and (ii) the renegotiation or renewal of any contract or other arrangements or letting of any new contract in regard to the commercial filming and/or electronic transmission of AKC-approved events. The exceptions to these requirements are stated at the end of this policy.

A. Contractual Requirements.

1. All rights to the commercial filming, electronic transmission, broadcast, distribution of images and exploitation of events held under AKC rules are owned by AKC.

2. By submitting an application for and receiving approval to hold an event under AKC rules, the club grants AKC, its employees, agents, licensees and others working for it or on its behalf the unlimited, irrevocable right and authority to access the event for any reason in AKC’s discretion including, but not limited to, filming, photographing, electronically transmitting or distributing the images of the event. The club agrees that it has not and will not enter into any arrangement or agreement with any other party that will prohibit, limit or prevent AKC’s access rights to the club event.

3. Reasonable recognition, both visually and orally, of the event-giving club and the AKC.

4. Reasonable monetary compensation for the event-giving club and for AKC.

5. Assurance that commercial filming and/or electronic transmission of any AKC-approved event will not diminish or impugn the reputation of the sport of purebred dogs, the event-giving club, or AKC and will conform to the AKC Bylaws and will support and grow the sport of purebred dogs, purebred dog events, and the best interests of the AKC and the event-giving club.

6. Defined amounts of airtime devoted to the promotion of the sport of purebred dogs and AKC.

7. Exercise of a good-faith effort to avoid scheduling conflicts with the airing of other AKC dog events.

8. Assurance for compliance with then-current "AKC Operational Requirements for Commercial Filming and Electronic Transmission at Events" policies and procedures, a copy of which shall be attached as an addendum to the contract.

9. Provision for confidentiality.

 

B. Exceptions to this policy include the following:

1. “Limited Use” filming. “Limited Use” filming is defined as the recording of moving images by individuals solely for their personal consumption or by the club for the purpose of producing a record of the winners or the club’s publications, website or social media platforms, and which is not intended for mass commercial transmission or distribution.

2. Editorial news coverage. Editorial news coverage is defined as media coverage by any local or national media outlet. The Commercial Filming at Events Operational Policy applies to all media outlets. The club is responsible for enforcing that policy.

 

This commercial filming and/or electronic transmission policy will be effective December 1, 2017. The Board also shall make special provision for clubs that have permitted electronic transmission of their past shows and that have contracts already in force on the date the board implements this policy. Any waiver of this policy must be approved by AKC. The Executive Secretary shall enforce this policy. immediately.

 

2019, 2020 and 2021 Delegate Meetings - The Board reviewed proposed dates for Board and Delegates meetings in 2019, 2020 and 2021. This will be discussed further at the January 2018 meeting.

 

Requirements For AKC Membership - Bylaws Article IV, Sections 1, 2 and 3 - The Board reviewed the requirements for AKC Membership contained in the Bylaws Article IV, Sections 1, 2 and 3. There were no suggested changes at this time.

 

Canine Legislation Position Statement on Civil Damages in Cases Involving Injury to Pets - The Board reviewed a recommendation for a new canine legislation position statement demonstrating AKC support for courts’ use of traditional economic damages in cases involving negligent injury to an animal, and opposition to legislatures’ permission of courts’ use of “non-economic” damages in such cases.

 

Canine Legislation Position Statement on Support for Detection and Working Dogs - The Board reviewed a recommendation for a new position statement which affirms AKC support for legislation and public policy initiatives (including the introduction of legislation) to improve and expand the quality and availability of domestically-bred and trained detection and other working dogs that play an important role in U.S. public and national security.

 

Canine Legislation Position Statement on Groomer Safety and Licensing - The Board reviewed a recommendation for a new canine legislation position statement regarding safety and licensing of professional groomers. This position statement provides a basis for AKC to comment, where appropriate, on a rapidly increasing number of legislative proposals at the state and local level that are aimed at regulating dog grooming enterprises.
Following a motion by Ms. Biddle, seconded by Dr. Battaglia, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent: Mr. Wooding) to consider all three proposed Government Relations’ position statements at this meeting waiving its normal notice procedures.  Following a motion by Dr. Battaglia, seconded by Dr. Davies, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent: Mr. Wooding) to approve the recommended Canine Legislation Position Statements on; Canine Civil Damages in Cases Involving Injury to Pets, the Statement on Support for Detection and Working Dogs, and the Statement on Groomer Safety and Licensing. All are effective upon adoption.

 

Canine Legislation Position Statement on Civil Damages in Cases Involving Injury to Pets - The AKC supports the appropriate awarding of traditional economic damages in cases involving negligent injury to an animal. Together with criminal laws that prohibit animal cruelty and dog fighting, and civil laws that address both intentional and negligent injury or death of an animal, traditional economic damages in cases involving the negligent injury or death of an animal help create a stable legal system that promotes responsible animal ownership, deters animal abuse, and promotes innovative, affordable, and quality animal care.

 

The AKC opposes the awarding of non-economic damages in cases involving the negligent injury to an animal.


Canine Legislation Position Statement on Support for Detection and Working Dogs - The American Kennel Club values the contribution that working and detection dogs make to national security and the extraordinary role that these dogs play in protecting the peace and security of individuals, communities and nations against extremist threats. The AKC honors the breeders, trainers and handlers of these dogs, and supports expanded scientific research and breeding programs to ensure that sufficient high quality domestically-bred dogs are available to ensure public safety and national security, and that specialized care is provided to assure the wellbeing of these dogs.

 

Canine Legislation Position Statement on Groomer Safety and Licensing - Appropriate grooming to ensure health and wellbeing is part of responsible dog ownership. The time an owner spends grooming a dog helps to build the bond between dog and owner. Health and safety should always be primary considerations when grooming a dog. In addition to other appropriate training, AKC recommends that professional groomers should pass a course and exam on basic health and safety standards, such as AKC Salon Safety or a similar program, prior to being licensed as a professional groomer. Grooming that is incidental to preparing a dog for a dog show or other exhibition should be conducted with similar care but should not be subject to licensing or professional grooming regulations.

 

GR Update Third Quarter 2017 - YEAR-TO-DATE 2017 UPDATE (AS OF OCTOBER 17, 2017) - Legislative/Regulatory Tracking: As of October 17, 2017, Congress, seven states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico are in session, and seven states are in a special legislative session. The AKC GR team is monitoring approximately 1,800 pieces of legislation that could impact responsible dog ownership, the health and wellbeing of dogs, the rights of dog owners, and/or the interests of the American Kennel Club. We are also monitoring approximately 375 proposed regulation changes at the state and federal level. Many state legislatures have now adjourned for the year sine die (subject to being called back for a special session.) Legislation can move at a fast pace. National alerts and a list of current legislation and status updated daily is available on the AKC GR Legislative Action Center microsite at www.akcgr.org.

 

AKC GR Southeastern Legislative Conference: The AKC’s Southeastern Legislative conference took place on September 24, in Atlanta, Georgia. This third 2017 GR legislative conference emphasized federation building, proactive policy development, and legislative strategy for the South. Attendees came from North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida. Seven speakers covered a wide range of topics.

 

Upcoming Legislative Conferences: GR staff are in the preliminary planning stage for a mini conference/meeting to establish/re-build a state federation in Maryland; regional conferences in New York and California, and a National conference in 2018.

 

Legal Outreach Committee - The Board reviewed a letter submitted by the Legal Outreach Committee. They requested that the Board approve the establishment of a modest reimbursement policy to facilitate membership in the American Bar Association's Animal Law Committee by up to five Delegate/Legal Outreach Committee members capped at $2,000 per person. Following a motion by Mr. Feeney, seconded by Mr. Powers, it was VOTED (unanimously absent: Mr. Wooding) to approve reimbursement up to a maximum of $10,000 annually.

 

Purebred Consumer Demand Plan - Kirsten Bahlke, Vice President Consumer Demand, participated in this portion of the meeting. The Board was presented with the Department’s plans for the newly created area of Consumer Demand for Purebred Dogs. This new department will focus specifically on increasing demand for purebred dogs with the general public.

 

New Breed for Foundation Stock Service® - Croatian Sheepdog - The Board was advised that the Foundation Stock Service (FSS) Committee recently approved a petition for the Croatian Sheepdog to be accepted into the FSS program.

 

Quarterly Communications Department Update - The Board viewed the Communications department’s quarterly report.

Totals:

Clips Evaluated in Q3: 3,594

Q3 Audience Reached: 5,015,225,421

Publicity Value for Q3: $6,826,283.98

Total clips YTD: 18,784

 

Select Media Coverage:

Date Media Outlet Subject Audience
7/7/17 New York Times Canine Good Citizen 597,955
7/9/17 NBC Nightly News Canine Good Citizen 4,418,917
7/19/17 Good Morning America Pet theft 24,140,460
9/26/17 New York Times Guggenheim pulls dog exhibit 597,955

The Board adjourned at 5:21p.m. - Meeting reconvened on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 8:07 am.

 

COMPANION AND PERFORMANCE - Obedience Stay Exercises - The Board at their October meeting had an in-depth discussion of the recommendation to replace the group exercises in the Obedience Novice and Open Classes, as well as in the Preferred Novice, Preferred Open, Graduate Novice, and Team classes, with new exercises that will demonstrate a dog’s ability to stay. The Board continued to discuss the issue at length at the November meeting. The proposed changes are driven by exhibitor concerns that a dog will leave its position during the group exercise and bother another dog. The Board was presented with a history of the Group Exercises discussions and actions taken from 2007 to present.


Obedience Group Exercise History from 2007 – Present

 

2007 Obedience Advisory Committee – to discuss all the Obedience Regulations:

• There were a large number of requests to change the Group Exercises and to eliminate the Open out of sight Group Exercise.

• The OAC members were split about what to do.

• Action was tabled. It was decided that AKC would conduct a survey of obedience judges to quantify the issue.

• The 15-month survey took place from Oct 2007-Dec 2008. Judges reported every time a dog moved from the place where it was left in the Group Exercise.

• According to the final report:

o 2,567 dogs moved from the place they were told to stay during the Group Exercises.

o Of the dogs that moved, 23% of the dogs interfered with another dog.

 

2013 Group Task Force - assembled to specifically review concerns regarding the Obedience Group Exercises:

• Many suggestions were received. All the suggestions were reviewed and discussed.

• The Committee made several recommendations to reduce interference. The recommendations were implemented in May 2014:

1. If a dog non-qualified during the individual exercises and in the opinion of the judge the dog demonstrated uncontrolled behavior, the judge must release the dog from performing the Group Exercises;

2. Dogs must be spaced with a minimum of 4 feet between each dog;

3. Require that dogs be under control when entering and exiting the ring;

4. If a judge observed any sign of aggression, or potential problems with the dogs as they were assembling outside of the ring to come in for the Group Exercise, the judge must excuse the dog and not allow them into the ring for the Group Exercise.

 

2014 Obedience Advisory Committee – to discuss all the Obedience Regulations:

• This OAC received many suggestions regarding additional Group Exercise modifications.

• The key additional Group Exercise recommendation was to keep the leash on the dogs in the Novice Group Exercises. This was implemented effective December 2015.

 

In late 2016 staff decided to hold another Group Exercise Task Force meeting. Meeting was held in June 2017:

• In April, the names of the Group Task Force members were published and the Fancy wrote in many suggestions for changes to the Group Exercises.

• These suggestions and all the previous suggestions were discussed during the June meeting.

• The Task Force recommended the elimination or modification of the existing Group exercises and the substitution of other exercises to demonstrate a dog’s ability to stay.

• Surveys indicated that 66% of the fancy supported eliminating the Group exercises, 19% were opposed and 15% submitted a variety of alternatives.

• In October, staff supports the Task Force recommendations and submits to the AKC Board for review.

• In November, Board approves the recommendations, which will become effective May 1, 2018.

 

The Board reviewed the staff’s updated memo that reflected the input received from the fancy.
Following a motion by Dr. Davies, seconded by Mr. Menaker, it was VOTED (unanimously; absent: Mr. Wooding) to amend the Obedience Regulations to replace the group exercises in the obedience novice and open classes, as well as in the Preferred Novice, Preferred Open, Graduate Novice, and Team classes, with new exercises that will demonstrate a dog’s ability to stay. This change will remove the opportunity for dogs to leave their position and interfere with other dogs in competition.

 

These Regulation changes will become effective May 1, 2018. (See Appendix A)

 

Agility - Change in Eligibility for Premier Class - The Board reviewed a recommendation to allow all dogs to be eligible to enter the Agility Premier classes. Currently Premier classes are limited to dogs that are eligible to compete at the Master level.

 

Current exhibitors are requesting that they be allowed to enter Premier when they feel they and their dogs are ready for the challenge. Initially staff felt the Premier class should be limited to those at the Master level, but now with two years of experience with the class, AKC staff agrees that this restriction should be eliminated and it should be opened up so handlers can enter when they feel their dog is prepared for this class. This will be discussed further at the January Board meeting.

 

CGC Ready Program - The Board reviewed information on a new application of the CGC program called CGC-Ready. While there are no changes to the existing CGC program, CGC-ready is a model for increasing participation in the existing CGC program via new channels.

 

CGC-Ready provides an expansion of the CGC concept to settings where staff or volunteer trainers train dogs either 1) for their existing owners, or 2) or to prepare them for adoption.

 

The CGC-Ready concept is ideally suited for settings and agencies such as:

• Rescue organizations (including all of AKC’s breed rescue)

• Shelters

• Prison based dog training programs

• Dog daycare

• Boarding kennels with Board & Train programs

 

Without objection, CGC-Ready will be implemented on January 3, 2018. There was no objection.

 

JUDGING OPERATIONS - Mrs. Letitia Bett - The Board reviewed a memo regarding complaints received over the judging of Best in Show by Ms. Letitia Bett. Specifically, it was alleged after Mrs. Bett judged judged the Best in Show competition, and while waiting for pictures to be taken, informed the exhibitors that an error was made at which time she returned to the judge's table and made changes to her judge's book to reverse the Best in Show and Reserve Best in Show awards, exchanging the ribbons between the two exhibitors, and altering her judge’s book to reflect the revised awards.  Following a motion by Dr. Garvin, seconded by Mr. Dok the Board VOTED (affirmative; Dr. Battaglia, Mr. Dok, Dr. Garvin, Ms. McAteer, Mr. Menaker, Mr. Powers, Ms. Wallin; opposed: Mr. Carota, Dr. Davies; absent: Mr. Wooding) to suspend Mrs. Bett’s AKC judging privileges for a period of one year and to impose a fine of $500.00 for failure to follow AKC Procedures, Rules, and Guidelines, effective immediately. In addition, Mrs. Bett’s eligibility to judge Best in Show at AKC events is removed effective immediately for an indefinite period. Unpublished

 

Conformation Dog Show Judges Annual Report - Staff reported that current Approval Process has significantly increased the number of additional breed applications submitted, the number of additional breeds granted, and the number of additional groups individuals are eligible to judge. Judges are taking full advantage of the ability to apply for additional breeds while permit in others, the increase in the number of permit breeds one may have at a time, and the decreased requirements to advance from permit to regular status in a breed.

 

CONFORMATION - Junior Showmanship Regulations, Section 7. Eligibility of Dog597,955 - Following a motion by Dr. Davies, seconded by Ms. McAteer the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent: Mr. Wooding) to amend the Section 7 of the Junior Showmanship Regulations to allow all FSS breeds to be shown in Junior Showmanship provided the dog has an AKC FSS number. This is effective January 1, 2018.

 

Section 7. Eligibility of Dog - Each dog entered in a regular Juniors Showmanship Class at an All-breed dog show must be an AKC recognized breed or FSS Breed with an AKC number and at least 6 months of age on the day of the event.

 

A Limited Breed Dog Club, Group Show, has the option to offer the opportunity for a Junior to show any breed eligible to be entered at an All-breed event or a breed eligible to compete in that event including the Miscellaneous Class breeds. At Specialty Shows, only the breed for the specialty is eligible to be entered.

 

Dogs may be PAL/ILP, Full-, or Limited-Registered to compete in Junior Showmanship Classes, additionally, spayed and neutered specimens are eligible for competition.

 

A Foreign dog, from a registry accepted by AKC for Registration, of an AKC Recognized breed is eligible to be entered on its Foreign Number.

 

The dog must be entered in one of the classes associated with the event or must be entered for Junior Showmanship only.

 

An eligible dog other than the one entered may be substituted. Such substitution must be accompanied by an official AKC entry form. The junior must have the AKC number of the substitute dog. All such substitutions must be made with the Superintendent or Show Secretary at least one half hour prior to the judging of any Junior Showmanship Classes at the show. Each dog must be owned or co-owned by the Junior Handler or by the Junior Handler’s father, mother, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, grandfather, or grandmother, including the corresponding step and half relations, or by a permanent member of the Junior Handler’s household as recorded with The American Kennel Club at the time entries close or an application for transfer of ownership must be sent to The American Kennel Club by the new owner within seven days after the last day of the show.

 

BITCHES IN SEASON ARE NOT ELIGIBLE.

 

A Junior is limited to one substitute on at a dog show. If one of the owners of the dog is a judge, the dog may be entered in Junior Showmanship Only to be exhibited by the Junior at an event where the judge is judging classes other than Junior Showmanship.

 

Junior Showmanship Regulations, Section 5. Class Eligibility - The Board reviewed a recommendation to revise the Junior Showmanship Regulations, Section 5, Classes and Divisions for the Master Class requiring the Junior to move to the next class when criteria are met. Following a motion from Mr. Powers, seconded by Dr. Battaglia, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent: Mr. Wooding) to consider the matter at this meeting waiving its normal notice procedures. Following a motion by Mr. Powers, seconded by Mr. Carota the Board Voted (unanimously; absent: Mr. Wooding) to amend Section 5 (C) Master, of the Junior Showmanship Regulations

 

Section 5. Classes and Divisions. The regular Junior Showmanship Classes shall be:

(C) Master. This class will be for boys and girls who are at least 9 years old and under 18 years on the day of the show, and who have won 10 Best Junior wins with competition. The calendar for this class will be consistent with the eligibility dates for the AKC National Championship. All Juniors Meeting the criteria for this class are required to enter the Master Class and must change their entry the day of the show if entries have already closed. Once the eligibility time frame for that year has passed all participants return to the Open Class to compete for the following year. This change will become effective January 1, 2018.

 

Reinstatement of a Dog Disqualified for Attacking - The Board reviewed a proposal from the Dog Show Rules Committee (DSRC). The DSRC is proposing a number of changes to the DQ/reinstatement process under the provisions of Chapter 11, Section 8-A, of the Rules Applying to Dog Shows. This is a similar proposal to the one submitted in July 2014 & October 2016. At the October 2014 & October 2016 Board meetings the Board voted unanimously not to approve the proposed rule change or the proposed changes in the reinstatement procedures. This will be discussed further at a future meeting.

 

Central Florida Kennel Club’s Reinstatement Proposal - The Board reviewed proposed revisions to Chapter 11, Section 8-A of the Rules Applying to Dog Shows which deals with a dog being disqualified for attack. The proposal was submitted by the Delegate for Central Florida Kennel Club (CFKC), Julian Prager.  This proposal is different in several ways from the one submitted by the DSRC. This will be discussed further at a future meeting.

 

Number Of Events Per Year For Limited - Breed Clubs - The Staff presented a revision to the Limited Number of Events Policy to clarify that Limited-Breed clubs are included in this policy. This will be discussed further at the January meeting.

 

Proposed policy (new wording is underlined):

 

Limited Number of Events Policy (April 2009 Board meeting, amended March 2015, July 2016, and January 2017 Board meetings)

 

A local All-breed or limited-breed club has the option to hold two shows in a calendar year. Local specialty clubs have the option to hold shows on two days per year. Local specialty clubs holding two days of shows per year have the option to hold one additional show in conjunction with their breed’s national specialty. There is no limit on national clubs. All-breed and limited-breed clubs in Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and all-breed clubs considered geographically isolated by territory and/or show sites have the option to hold up to four shows. Show or obedience clubs have the option to hold any number of obedience trials.

 

Geographically isolated all-breed clubs are determined by: no AKC club with 75 straight-line miles between territories unless the club's show site is greater than 75 driving miles from the nearest show site or the average distance from a club's show site to the 10 closest show sites is greater than 200 miles. Google maps will be used to consider the show site to show site option.

 

AKC’s Membership Requirement in Order to Remain a Licensed/Member Club - Based on a request of the Board Staff reviewed current policy and considered if clubs should be required to maintain the same membership level needed to form a new club in order to remain a licensed/member club.

 

Under Board policy, clubs must meet a minimum household membership requirement in order to become accredited and subsequently a licensed/member club.

 

 

Min Household

Requirement to

Form a Club

Est. % of Existing

Clubs Not Meeting

This Requirement

All-Breed Conformation Clubs 30 43%
Specialty Conformation Clubs 20 20%
Field Trial Clubs 20 25%

 
The Board asked staff to perform additional review of the issue and suggest minimum requirements for clubs. This will be discussed at a future meeting.

 

COMPLIANCE - Compliance Quarterly Update - The Compliance Division provided its quarterly update on its activities through the third quarter. The monthly date in the Correction, Conditional and Cancellation Report has been provided to Compliance by the Registration Department, and effective January 1, 2018, will be the responsibility of that Department and will not continue to be reported on by Compliance.

 

Dealing with Misconduct at AKC Events – Add a Section Concerning Minors Participation - The Legal Department received a request to provide guidelines to Event Committees regarding a minor’s participation in disciplinary actions taken at events, which are handled by Event Committees.  Staff is recommending that an additional section be added to Dealing with Misconduct at American Kennel Club Events, addressing matters relating to a minor’s participation in disciplinary matters and if needed, Event Committee hearings. This will be discussed again at the January meeting.

 

The following AKC Management actions were reported: Ms. Laurie Persky (Freehold, NJ) Action was taken by the Sussex Hills Kennel Club for conduct at its September 3, 2017, event. Ms. Persky was charged with failure to properly control a dog at an event.  The Staff Committee reviewed the Event report and determined that a serious procedural error occurred in the handling of the matter. Specifically, no actual hearing was held. Due to this serious procedural error, the Staff Committee nullified the Event Committee’s action and remanded the matter back to the Event Committee for a rehearing to occur. PENDING

 

Ms. Jeannine DePalma (Wilson, NY) Action was taken by the Western Lakes Training Club of Buffalo for conduct at its September 10, 2017 event. Ms. DePalma was charged with failure to properly control a dog at an event.  The Staff Committee reviewed the Event report and determined that serious procedural errors occurred in the handling of the matter. Specifically, three Event Committee members also testified as witnesses, and no witnesses testified in person at the hearing. Due to these serious procedural errors, the Staff Committee nullified the Event Committee’s action and remanded the matter back to the Event Committee for a rehearing to occur. PENDING

 

Ms. Carola Adams (Noonan, Canada) Action was taken by the Cape Cod Kennel Club for conduct at its September 17, 2017 event. Ms. Adams was charged with disregard of published club regulations. The Staff Committee reviewed the Event report and set the penalty at a reprimand and a $100 fine.

 

Mr. Deanna Brown (Carthage, MO) Action was taken by the St. Croix Valley Kennel Club for conduct at its September 21, 2017, event. Ms. Brown was charged with inappropriate, abusive or foul language.The Staff Committee reviewed the Event report and determined that serious procedural errors occurred in the handling of the matter. Specifically, no one testified in person at the hearing. Written statements were used as testimony, which resulted in no sworn testimony being provided. Due to these serious procedural errors, the Staff Committee nullified the Event Committee’s action and remanded the matter back to the Event Committee for a rehearing to occur. PENDING

 

Mr. Joe Karpen (Weaverville, NC) Action was taken by the Western Carolina Dog Fanciers Association for conduct at its September 22, 2017, event. Mr. Karpen was charged with failure to properly control a dog at an event. The Staff Committee reviewed the Event report and set the penalty at a reprimand and a $200 fine. PENDING

 

Ms. Shana Witbeck (Vernal, UT) Action was taken by the Grand Valley Kennel Club for conduct at its September 29, 2017, event. Ms. Witbeck was charged with cruelty in connection with an event, neglect in connection with an event, and whelping dogs at event site. The Staff Committee reviewed the Event report and dismissed the charge of cruelty in connection with an event. It upheld the charge of neglect at or in connection with an event and whelping dogs at event site and set the penalty at a one year suspension from all AKC privileges and a $3000 fine. PENDING

 

The AKC’s Management Disciplinary Committee has reprimanded Ms. Dawn Knight (Anthony, FL) for submitting an online litter registration application on behalf of the sire owner without written permission. (Doberman Pinscher, Chihuahua)

 

The AKC’s Management Disciplinary Committee has suspended Mr. Adam Keith (Fincastle, VA) from AKC event privileges for two years and imposed a $2000 fine, effective November 13, 2017, for harassment and physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature. (Beagle) PENDING

 

The AKC’s Management Disciplinary Committee has suspended Mr. Thomas Growney (Milford, PA) from all AKC privileges for six months and imposed a $500 fine, effective November 13, 2017, for refusal to make his dogs and records available for inspection when requested. (Beagle)

 

The AKC’s Management Disciplinary Committee has suspended Ms. Margaret Graf (Newville, PA) from all AKC privileges for five years and imposed a $1000 fine, effective November 13, 2017, for conduct prejudicial to purebred dogs, purebred dog events, or the best interests of the American Kennel Club based on her violation of the AKC’s Judicial or Administrative Determination of Inappropriate Treatment Policy (German Shepherd Dog, Chihuahua)

PENDING

 

CLUBS - REPORT ON MEMBER CLUB BYLAWS APPROVED IN SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER

Beaver County Kennel Club, Beaver County, PA (1956)

Lehigh Valley Kennel Club, Lehigh County, PA (1935)

Windward Hawaiian Dog Fancier Association, Kaneohe, HI (1991)

 

NEW LICENSED CLUBS APPROVED IN SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER

Deppe Coonhound Association of North Carolina, Maysville, NC, 15 total households, 9 local.

North Jersey Siberian Husky Club, greater Sparta, NJ 20 total households, 13 local.

Southampton Coonhunters Association of Virginia, Suffolk, VA, 28 total households, 11 local.

 

BUSINESS UPDATE - Alexandra Aleskovsky, Executive Vice President and Chief Growth Officer, participated in the discussion to answer questions on a few new initiatives.

 

Marketplace is expanding into two new verticals in November:

1) GroomerFinder, which enable dog owners to easily find groomers and grooming salons near them. Those that pass the AKC Safety in the Salon course and promise to adhere to the program’s oath can apply to be AKC S.A.F.E. Groomers and Salons.

2) PetSitters and Walkers will also launch in November and will be accessible through the Rover.com platform. Boarding advertisements will only be allowed where it is legal. Rover.com is the nation’s largest network of 5-star pet sitters and dog walkers. Rover accepts less than 20% of potential sitters. AKC will only display their 5-Star service providers listings.

 

Revenues are higher for:

• Ecommerce – 57% higher than 2016

• AKC Shop - 175% higher than 2016

• Digital Advertising is 20% ahead for the month.

 

Foreign Dual Registration - Mark Dunn, Senior Vice President Registration & Customer Development, participated in this portion of the meeting. Based on a Board request, staff provided an update on the concept of dual registration for use in conjunction with select AKC-recognized foreign kennel clubs. The Board approved of this concept and asked that staff proceed with developing this opportunity.

 

CONSENT ITEMS:

• Delegate Approvals

• Cesky Terrier Proposed Breed Standard Revision

• Dachshund Proposed Breed Standard Revision

• Concurrent Event Limits

• Realignment of Point Schedule Divisions

• Trophies in Honor Of

• Agility Geographically Isolated Clubs

• Reducing Sanctioned Match Program for Local Speciality Clubs

• Retriever Field Trials – Allow Clubs to Hold Up To Four Derby/Qualifying Stakes

• Agility Increase of Judging Limit

 

Cesky Terrier Proposed Breed Standard Revision - The Board VOTED to approve the proposed breed standard changes submitted by and voted on by The American Cesky Terrier Association, Inc. with an effective date of January 1, 2018. (See Appendix B)

 

Dachshund Proposed Breed Standard Revision - The Board VOTED to approve the proposed breed standard changes to the Color Section of the Smooth Dachshund Standard as submitted by and voted on by The Dachshund Club of America with an effective date of January 1, 2018.

 

Color Section of the Smooth Dachshund Standard

Smooth Dachshund:

Color of Hair–Although base color is immaterial, certain patterns and basic colors predominate. One-colored Dachshunds include red and cream, with or without a shading of interspersed dark hairs. A small amount of white on the chest is acceptable, but not desirable. Nose and nails-black. Two-colored Dachshunds include black, chocolate, wild boar, gray (blue) and fawn (Isabella), each with deep, rich tan or cream markings over the eyes, on the sides of the jaw and underlip, on the inner edge of the ear, front, breast, sometimes on the throat, inside and behind the front legs, on the paws and around the anus, and from there to about one-third to one-half of the length of the tail on the underside. Undue prominence of tan or cream markings is undesirable. A small amount of white on the chest is acceptable but not desirable. Nose and nails–in the case of black dogs, black; for chocolate and all other colors, dark brown, but self-colored is acceptable.

 

Dappled Dachshunds–The dapple (merle) pattern is expressed as lighter-colored areas contrasting with the darker base color, which may be any acceptable color.

 

Neither the light nor the dark color should predominate. Nose and nails are the same as for one- and two-colored Dachshunds. Partial or wholly blue (wall) eyes are as acceptable as dark eyes. A large area of white on the chest of a dapple is permissible.

 

Brindle is a pattern (as opposed to a color) in which black or dark stripes occur over the entire body although in some specimens the pattern may be visible only in the tan points.

 

Piebald is a pattern (as opposed to a color) with clearly defined areas and/or patches of white on any allowed one-colored or two-colored dogs. Two-colored piebald patterned dogs may show tan markings on the face and around the anus. There are no patches of lighter shadings within the colored areas as in the dapple pattern. Ticking in the white areas is acceptable. Eye color, eye rims, nose and lips are well pigmented and in accordance with the base color; eyes are never partially or wholly blue as distinguished from the dapple pattern. Eyes partially or wholly blue is a disqualification. Head must not be more than 50 percent white and color(s) other than white must cover both ears, back and front, and extend without interruption from the ears over both eyes. A head of more than 50 percent white or white on any portion of either ear, back or front, or around the eyes is a disqualification. Pure white dogs with no body spots except on the head are to be disqualified. Nails may be partially or wholly white.

 

Sable–the sable pattern consists of a uniform dark overlay on red dogs. The overlay hairs are double-pigmented, with the tip of each hair much darker than the base color. The pattern usually displays a widow’s peak on the head. Nose, nails and eye rims are black. Eyes are dark, the darker the better.

 

Colors or patterns other than those specified above are a disqualification.

 

DISQUALIFICATION: Knuckling over of front legs.

In the piebald pattern:

• eyes partially or wholly blue, or

• a head of more than 50 percent white, or

• white covering any portion of the ears, back and front, or around the eyes, or

• pure white with no body spots except on the head.

Colors or patterns other than those specified above.

 

Concurrent Event Limits - The Board VOTED to approve a Staff recommendation to amend the Concurrent Specialty Shows and Same Day Specialty Shows policies to allow clubs to accept more entries. The new policies are:

 

Concurrent Specialty Shows

 

Independent specialties may be held concurrently with an all-breed show with the following limitations:

1. The specialty club must obtain permission from the all-breed club in order to apply.

2. The maximum number of independent specialties will be determined by the Event Operations Staff, considering the adequacy of the all-breed show's facility.

3. The specialty must be held on the same grounds as the concurrent all-breed show (i.e. the same physical address).

4. The entry in the Specialty breed(s) is limited to 100 entries per ring per judge per day in both the specialty & all-breed club events.

5. The ownership of the corresponding date must be agreed upon in writing prior to event approval.

6. The breed judging at either the all-breed show or the independent specialty may occur first, but the scheduling must accommodate Group judging.

7. Evening specialties will be permitted for breeds that are not holding concurrent specialties with the all-breed show.

 

Same Day Specialty Shows

Two independent specialty shows of the same breed of no more than one hundred entries per ring per judge each, inclusive of sweepstakes, special attractions or matches, may be permitted at the same location on the same day. This change is effective January 1, 2018.

 

Realignment of Point Schedule Divisions - The Board VOTED to realign the composition of states within the Conformation point schedule divisions. The goal of the realignment is to make the show sizes in a division as equal as possible. The following changes will be in the Conformation points schedule that will become effective in May 2018:

• Michigan moved to Division 5.

• Division 6 modified to consist of two states, Arizona and Colorado.

• Kansas moved to Division 7.

• Nebraska moved to Division 13.

• Tennessee moved to Division 14.

• Iowa and Missouri moved to Division 15.

The total variance between the average show size by state compared to the division average will be reduced by 9%, confirming the changes are an improvement compared to the current alignment.

 

Trophies in Honor of - The Board VOTED to modify its policy on trophies donated in honor of living dogs and living people.  This change is effective immediately.

IV. Ribbons/Prizes

B. In honor of

1) Trophies may be offered in memory of deceased dogs or people.

2) Trophies may be offered in honor of a living person or dog.

 

Agility – Geographically Isolated Clubs - The Board VOTED to amend Chapter 1, Section 5 of the Regulations for Agility Trials to allow geographically isolated clubs licensed for agility, to hold up to 15 agility trials per year. This is effective January 1, 2018.

Chapter 1. Regulations for Agility Trials

Section 5. Making Application. A club or association that meets the requirements of the American Kennel Club that wishes to hold a trial at which qualifying scores toward titles may be earned must make application to the American Kennel Club on the form provided for permission to hold the trial. An application fee must accompany each application.

  A club may be approved to hold up to twelve (12) licensed or member events in a calendar year. A club can be approved to hold separate trails on consecutive days. Each day is considered a separate trial. A club shall not be approved to hold more than one trial on any single day except in the case of a specialty club offering a single breed specialty trial in conjunction with their all-breed trial or offering two single breed specialties on the same per Chapter 1, Section 2.

  Clubs licensed to hold agility in Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and geographically isolated clubs may hold up to fifteen (15) licensed or member events in a calendar year. Geographically isolated clubs will be determined by the club's show site being greater than 150 driving miles from the nearest show site of another club that has held events within the past 18 months. Google Maps will be used to consider the driving distance from show site to show site.

 

Reducing Sanctioned Match Program for Local Specialty Clubs - The Board VOTED to approve a change to policy, which reduces the number of sanctioned matches new local specialty clubs or clubs currently in the accreditation process are required to hold before being considered for approval to hold a licensed show.
The new policy requires one conformation Plan B match and one “qualifying” Plan A match held at least six months apart, based on individual member experience within the club. At least 25% of voting club members must have 10 years exhibiting and/or judging experience in the sport. If the club does not have 25% experienced members, then one Plan B match followed six months later by two “qualifying” Plan A matches held at least 6 months apart would be required. This is a change is effective December 1, 2017.

 

Retriever Field Trials – Allow Clubs to hold up to Four Derby/Qualifying Stakes - The Board VOTED to amend Chapter 14, Section 11 of the Field Trial Rules and Standard Procedure for Retrievers to allow licensed Retriever Field Trial Clubs to hold up to four Derby Stakes and four Qualifying stakes per calendar year. This change will allow clubs the opportunity to hold an additional derby or qualifying stake within a year, either as a stand alone or with their fall/spring trials, should they choose.

 

CHAPTER 14 - Section 11. Number of Trials/Stakes. Starting with paragraph #5. (Clubs may start applying to hold up to four Derby stakes and four Qualifying stakes per year April 1, 2018.)

A club may hold up to four Derby stakes and four Qualifying stakes (any combination of Qualifying and Owner-Handler Qualifying) per calendar year. These may be held in conjunction with an all-age trial or as stand-alone trials. No more than one Derby stake and one Qualifying stake may be offered at any one field trail. An Owner-Handler Qualifying stake may be held in conjunction with a Retriever Hunting Test that includes a Master level test. The same club may hold back-to-back stand-alone Derby/Qualifying trials (two separate event numbers).


Agility – Increase of Judging Limit - The Board VOTED to amend Chapter 1, Section 18 of the Regulations for Agility Trials to increase the Agility judging limits from 330 runs to 350 runs per day. (This change is effective January 1, 2018.)

Chapter 1. Regulations for Agility Trials

Section 18. Event Limit Options, Judge Assignment Changes and Load Balancing Entries. The maximum number of runs assigned to any judge in one day shall not exceed 350, not including and runs in non-regular classes, or as described within this section and Chapter 1, Section 20.

 

It was VOTED to adjourn Tuesday, November 14, at 11:43 p.m. - Adjourned - A true record Attest: Gina M. DiNardo, Executive Secretary
 

Appendix A

 

Chapter 1. General Regulations (paragraph 3)

Section 4. Obedience Classes Offered. (paragraph 3)

Regular classes are the traditional standard titling obedience classes. Preferred classes offer alternative titling opportunities without a group exercise and have reduced jump heights. Optional titling classes offer a variety of intermediate and standard exercises. Non-regular classes are not titling classes; they provide an opportunity for dogs and handlers to hone their skills and gain ring time.

 

Section 17. Disqualification, Ineligibility, Excusal, and Change in Appearance of Dogs. (paragraph 11)

     If it is reported to the trial secretary or the superintendent that the bitch is in season before the bitch enters the ring for judging the matter is to be brought to the attention of the trial committee.

 

Section 31. Stewards. Judges are in sole charge of their rings until their assignments are completed. Stewards are provided to assist but may act only on the judge’s instructions. They must not give information or instructions to owners and handlers except when the judge asks them to do so.

     The judge shall review with the stewards their duties and the manner in which they are to be performed. Any request from an exhibitor for special consideration must be directed to the judge.

 

Section 32. Ring Conditions. An indoor ring should be rectangular and about 40 by 50 feet for all obedience classes. The Utility ring should never be less than 35 by 50 feet, and the Novice or Open ring should not be less than 30 by 40 feet. The floor must have firm footing, using rubber or similar non-slip material at least 4 feet wide for the takeoffs and landings of all jumps unless the judge feels the surface does not require it.

     At an outdoor show or trial, the rings should be about 40 by 50 feet. The ground should be clean and level. Any grass should be cut short.

 

Under unusual or adverse weather conditions, a club may provide a separate regulation size ring for the group exercise. If inclement weather at an outdoor show or trial necessitates the judging of obedience under shelter, the requirements as to ring size may be waived.

     The judge’s table and chairs will be of such size and location so as not to interfere with the dog and handler’s performance while in the ring.

 

CHAPTER 2

REGULATIONS FOR PERFORMANCE AND JUDGING

JUDGING STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES

 

Section 4. Judge’s Directions. The judge’s orders and signals should be given to the handlers in a clear and understandable manner but in such a way that the work of the dogs is not disturbed. Before starting each exercise, the judge will ask, “Are you ready?” At the end of each exercise the judge will say, “Exercise finished.” Each dog will be worked and judged separately, except for during the group exercise. The judging of an exercise will not begin until the judge has given the first order.

 

Section 8. Re-judging. If a dog has failed an exercise, it will not ordinarily be re-judged unless the judge feels the dog’s performance was prejudiced by peculiar and unusual conditions. In such a case, the judge will re-judge the dog only on the portion of a two-part exercise in which the unusual condition occurred (e.g., the Figure 8 part of the Heel on Leash/Heel Free exercise, the Sit or Down part of the Novice Group-Sit and Down Stay exercise, the Sit or Down part of the Open Stay-Get Your Leash exercise, the first or second part of Directed Jumping).

     Re-judging of the dog or dogs for the group exercise will be done with the next scheduled group. The limits on the number of dogs allowed in the ring for the group exercise will apply as listed in Chapter 3, Section 12. Should there be no further group within that class, the dog or dogs to be re-judged will immediately do the exercise alone. The dog or dogs involved will be re-judged only on the exercise in question.

 

Section 10. Judge’s Book and Score Sheets. The judge must enter the number of points deducted from each exercise in the official judge’s book immediately after each dog has been judged on the individual exercises. An “NQ” should be recorded in the proper box and on the Total Score line for any dog that fails to qualify in that exercise. This is to be completed before the next dog is judged.

     If a handler leaves the ring the judge will mark the book “HLR” for “Handler Left Ring” and carry an “NQ” down to the Total Score box.

     If a dog has non-qualified and is released from performing the group exercise the judge will mark the book “NQ-R” (“Non-Qualifying Released”) and carry an “NQ” down to the Total Score box.

     Scores for the dogs performing the group exercise and qualifying total scores will be entered in the official judge’s book immediately after each group of dogs has been judged.

 

Section 11. Notification and Announcement of Scores. Immediately following the last individual exercise in Novice, the judge will inform the handler if the team may return for the group exercise. After the group exercise the judge will inform the handlers of a qualifying performance. In Beginner Novice, Preferred Novice, Graduate Novice, Open, Preferred Open, Graduate Open, Utility, Preferred Utility, and Versatility, the judge will inform the handler immediately following the last exercise of a qualifying performance.

 

Section 15. Judging Program Order. Dogs should be judged in the judging program order listed for each day if it is practical to do so without holding up any judging in any ring. The group exercise will be judged in judging program order. Judges are not required to wait for dogs for either the individual or the group exercise. Each handler is responsible for being ready at ringside when required and without being called. The judge’s first consideration should be the convenience of those exhibitors who are ready when scheduled and who ask no favors.

 

Section 16. Use of Leash. All dogs must be kept on a leash except when in the obedience ring, warm-up ring or exercise area and must be brought into and taken out of the ring on leash.

     Leashes must be clipped to the collar when dogs are brought in for classes requiring an on-leash exercise, a group exercise and awards. In a class where a leash is not required for the performance of the individual exercises, the dog may be brought into and taken out of the ring on a leash that slips/attaches through the dog’s collar.

 

The leash must be made of fabric or leather and need only be long enough to provide adequate slack during the Heel on Leash exercise, unless stated otherwise in these regulations. The Novice Group Exercise – Sit and Down Stay, and the Beginner Novice Sit for Exam must be performed with the dog on a 6-foot leash.

 

Section 25. Misbehavior. The handler is required to enter and exit the ring with the dog under control and without jumping, pulling or tugging on the leash. Any display of fear or nervousness by the dog or any uncontrolled behavior such as barking or running away from its handler must be penalized according to the seriousness of the misbehavior whether it occurs during or between an exercise or before or after judging. The judge may release the dog from further competition in the class.

     If a dog is working smartly and continuously but goes outside a ring boundary while completing an exercise (as opposed to a dog that bolts out of the ring or leaves the ring between exercises), the penalty, if any, is left to the discretion of the judge.

     If the misbehavior occurs during an exercise, the penalty must first be applied to the score for that exercise. Should the penalty be greater than the value of the exercise, the additional points will be deducted from the total score under Miscellaneous Penalties. If such behavior occurs before or after the judging or between exercises, the entire penalty will be deducted under Miscellaneous Penalties.

 

CHAPTER 3

NOVICE

Section 1. Novice A Class. The Novice A class shall be for dogs that have not won the CD title. A handler must own the dog entered or be a member of the owner’s household or immediate family and may not have previously handled any dog that has earned an AKC Regular or Preferred Novice, Open, or Utility title. Owners may enter more than one dog in this class. The same person who handles the dog in the first five exercises must handle the dog in the group exercise; however, if a person has handled more than one dog in the first five exercises that will participate in the group exercise, that person must provide a handler for the additional dog in the same group exercise. The additional handler for the group exercise need not be a member of the owner’s household or immediate family. No dog may be entered in both Novice A and Novice B at any one trial.

     Prior to the start of judging, the judge will decide where the leash will be placed and post this information at the ring approximately 45 minutes or earlier before the start of the class.

 

Section 2. Novice B Class. The owner or any other person may handle dogs in this class to earn a CD title. Owners may enter more than one dog in this class. The same person who handles the dog in the first five exercises must handle the dog in the group exercise; however, if a person has handled more than one dog in the first five exercises that will participate in the group exercise, that person must provide a handler for the additional dog in the same group exercise. No dog may be entered in both Novice A and Novice B at any one trial.

     Prior to the start of judging, the judge will decide where the leash will be placed and post this information at the ring approximately 45 minutes or earlier before the start of the class.

 

Section 3. Novice Exercises and Scores. The exercises and maximum scores in the Novice classes:

1. Heel on Leash and Figure Eight       40 points

2. Stand for Examination                    30 points

3. Heel Free                                       40 points

4. Recall                                             30 points

5. Sit Stay – Get Your Leash               30 points

6. Group Exercise – Sit & Down Stay   30 points

Maximum Total Score                       200 points

The maximum judging rate is nine (9) dogs per hour.

 

Section 12. Sit Stay – Get Your Leash. The principal feature of this exercise is that the dog remains in the sit position.

 

     The orders are: “Sit your dog,” “Leave your dog to get your leash,” and “Back to your dog.”

 

     The handler will stand with the dog sitting in heel position in a place designated by the judge. The judge will ask “Are you ready?” before giving the first order. On the judge’s order the handler may command and/or signal the dog to sit without touching either the dog or the dog’s collar. On further order to “Leave your dog to get your leash,” the handler may give a command and/or signal to stay and will walk forward immediately to the place designated by the judge for the leash, pick up the leash, turn, and face the dog. The judge will give the order “Back to your dog.” The handler must return directly, walking around and in back of the dog to heel position. The dog must not move from the sitting position until after the judge has said “Exercise finished.” The judge will tell the handler “Clip your leash to the collar and maintain control of your dog.” The handler is required to exit the ring with the dog under control and without jumping, pulling or tugging on the leash.

 

Judging Procedures: The judge will instruct the steward to place the leash at the designated location after the Heel on Leash and Figure Eight exercise. The handler and dog will be positioned at least 30 feet from and facing the direction of the gate entrance. The judge must be in position to watch the dog and handler throughout the exercise including exiting the ring.

 

Section 13. Sit Stay – Get Your Leash, Scoring. A non-qualifying score (NQ) is required for the following: The dog moving a substantial distance away from the place where it was left any time during the exercise, not remaining in the sit position until the handler has returned to heel position, and repeatedly barking or whining.

 

     Scoring of the exercise for such things as rough treatment of a dog by its handler or resistance by a dog to its handler’s attempts to make it sit starts with the first order, “Sit your dog.” These will be penalized substantially and in extreme cases the dog may be released.

 

     Substantial deductions will be made for a dog that moves even a short distance from where it was left, that barks or whines only once or twice, or that changes from the sit position after the handler has returned to the heel position and before the judge has said, “Exercise finished.” A substantial deduction, under Miscellaneous Penalties, must be made for a dog that does not remain under control while leaving the ring.

 

Section 14. Group Exercise – Sit and Down Stay. The principal feature of this exercise is that the dog remains in a sitting or down position, whichever is required at the time.

 

     The orders are: “Sit your dogs,” “Down your dogs,” “Leave your dogs,” and “Back to your dogs.”

 

     If a dog has non-qualified (NQ) in an individual exercise the judge must release the dog from performing the group exercise. A dog that does not remain sitting during the first part of this exercise must be released from participating in the second part.

 

     Handlers of dogs that have qualified during the individual exercises will have the option of returning for the group exercise. After completion of the last individual exercise, if the dog has qualified, the judge will ask if the handler will be returning for the group exercise. Once handlers have notified the judge of their decision not to return for the group exercise they may not change their minds. Dogs that have been released or excused and handlers who have left the ring during the individual exercises may not return for the group exercise. See Judges’ Guidelines, Judge’s Book.

 

     Dogs must be spaced with a minimum of six (6) feet between each dog and a minimum of four (4) feet from the ring barriers. Judges will position the dogs in the approximate center of the ring in one row or back-to-back in two rows with a minimum of six (6) feet between the rows. If the back-to-back formation is used, it must be used for all groups in the class. On a 50’ side of the ring the maximum # of dogs allowed in a single row would be six (6) and in a back-to-back row twelve (12) dogs (see table):

Ring Length

Maximum # of Dogs

Single Row

Maximum # of Dogs

Back-to-Back Row

50’

6

12

45'

5

10

40'

4

8

35'

4

8

30'

3

6

 

    The group exercise will be conducted after the last individual team in the class, or combined classes, is judged. If there are more dogs competing than can be handled in one group exercise, the judge will divide the class into approximately equal sections.

 

    If two classes in the same classification have different judges, each judge must judge the group exercise separately. A judge with only a single dog competing in a class would be required to have the dog perform the group exercise alone. If the same judge is judging both Novice A and B classes (in the same classification) and the combined total of the dogs returning for the group exercise can be judged in only one group without exceeding the limit of dogs based on the size of the ring, the judge may combine the two classes for the group exercise.

 

    This exercise must be performed with the dog on a 6-foot leash. The leash will remain clipped to the dog’s collar and the handler will hold on to the leash throughout the entire exercise. The armband will remain on the handler’s left arm. The dogs will be lined up in judging program order. Prior to beginning the exercise, the judge will instruct the handlers to remove their dog if it starts to move out of position. The judge will ask “Are you ready?” before giving the first order. On the judge’s order, the handlers will command and/or signal their dogs to sit without touching either the dog or the dog’s collar. On further order to “Leave your dogs,” the handlers may give a command and/or signal to stay and will walk forward immediately to the end of the leash, without jerking or tightening the leash, turn, and face their dogs. The leash must remain loose with slack throughout the entire exercise.

 

    After one minute from the time the judge ordered the handlers to leave their dogs, the judge will give the order “Back to your dogs.” The handlers must return directly, walking around and in back of their own dog to heel position. The dogs must not move from the sitting position until after the judge has said “Exercise finished.” This order will not be given until the handlers are back in heel position. The dogs must remain under control between this two-part exercise.

 

    Before starting the Down Stay portion of this exercise the judge will ask “Are you ready?” On the judge’s order, the handlers will command and/or signal their dog to down without touching either the dog or the dog’s collar. On further order to “Leave your dogs,” the handlers may give a command and/or signal to stay and will walk forward immediately to the end of the leash, without jerking or tightening the leash, turn, and face their dogs. The leash must remain loose with slack throughout the entire exercise.

 

    After one minute from the time the judge ordered the handlers to leave their dogs, the judge will give the order, “Back to your dogs.” The handlers must return directly, walking around and in back of their own dog to heel position. The dogs must not move from the down position until after the judge has said “Exercise finished.” This order will not be given until the handlers are back in heel position. The judge will tell the exhibitors “Maintain control of your dogs.” The handlers are required to exit the ring with their dogs under control and without jumping, pulling or tugging on the leash.

 

    Judging Procedure: If a judge observes any signs of aggression or potential problems when the dogs are being assembled outside the ring for the group exercise or once the dogs are brought into the ring, the judge must excuse the dog and mark the judge’s book “Excused” and state the reason.

 

    Any handlers who physically correct their dogs before or after the group exercise or while leaving the ring must be penalized under Miscellaneous Penalties.

 

    Judges must stand with their full attention on the dogs and handlers during the group exercise and remain alert to any potential problems. To have both dog and handler under constant observation in this exercise, a judge should take a position slightly to the rear of the dogs at one end of the row(s) of dogs.

 

    Section 15. Group Exercise – Sit and Down Stay, Scoring. A non-qualifying score (NQ) is required for the following: The dog moving a substantial distance away from the place where it was left any time during the exercise, not remaining in the required position until the handler has returned to heel position, and repeatedly barking or whining.

 

    Substantial deductions will be made for the following: A dog that must be repositioned by its handler if it is out of position enough to interfere with an adjacent dog (in extreme cases the dog may be released), that moves even a short distance from where it was left, that barks or whines only once or twice, or that changes position after the handler has returned to heel position and before the judge has said, “Exercise finished.” A substantial deduction will be made for jerking or tightening of the leash before the judge has said “Exercise finished;” depending on the extent, the deduction may include a non-qualifying (NQ) score. A substantial deduction, under Miscellaneous Penalties, must be made for a dog that does not remain under control while leaving the ring.

 

    Minor or substantial deductions, depending on the circumstances, will be made for touching the dog or its collar while getting the dog into the down position.

 

    Scoring of the exercise for such things as rough treatment of a dog by its handler or resistance by a dog to its handler’s attempts to make it sit or lie down starts with the first order, sit or down your dogs. These will be penalized substantially and in extreme cases the dog may be released.

 

The timing of each stay exercise begins on the judge’s order, “Leave your dogs.”

 

CHAPTER 4

OPEN

Section 1. Open A Class. The Open A class will be for dogs that have won the CD title but have not won the CDX title. Anyone who has trained or exhibited a dog that has earned an OTCH may not enter or handle dogs in this class. Each dog must be handled by its owner or by a member of the owner’s household or immediate family. Owners may enter more than one dog in this class. No dog may be entered in both the Open A and Open B classes at any one trial.

 

    Prior to the start of judging, the judge will decide where the leash will be placed and post this information at the ring approximately 45 minutes or earlier before the start of the class.

 

Section 2. Open B Class. The Open B class will be for dogs that have won the CD or CDX titles. A dog may continue to compete in this class after it has won the UD title. The owner or any other person may handle dogs in this class. Owners may enter more than one dog in this class. No dog may be entered in both Open A and Open B classes at any one trial.

     Prior to the start of judging, the judge will decide where the leash will be placed and the order of exercises to be performed in that class. The placement of the leash and the order will not be disclosed to exhibitors until it is posted at the ring, approximately 45 minutes or earlier before the start of the class. In future assignments, judges are required to alternate the six orders of exercises so that each will be used approximately the same number of times.

 

Section 3. Open A Exercises and Scores. The exercises and maximum score in the Open A class:

1. Heel Free and Figure Eight                             40 points

2. Command Discrimination (Stand, Down, Sit)  30 points

3. Drop on Recall                                               30 points

4. Retrieve on Flat                                             20 points

5. Retrieve over High Jump                                30 points

6. Broad Jump                                                   20 points

7. Stay – Get Your Leash (Sit, Down)                 30 points

Maximum Total Score                                      200 points

The maximum judging rate is eight (8) dogs per hour.

 

Section 4. Open B Exercises and Scores. The various orders of exercises in the Open B class (points and total scores are the same as in Open A):

OPEN I

OPEN II

1. Heel Free & Figure Eight

1. Broad Jump

2. Command Discrimination (Stand, Down, Sit)

2. Retrieve over High Jump

3. Retrieve on Flat

3. Drop on Recall

4. Drop on Recall

4. Retrieve on Flat

5. Command Discrimination

5. Retrieve over High Jump (Down, Sit, Stand)

6. Broad Jump

6. Figure Eight & Heel Free

7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Sit, Down)

7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Down, Sit)

   
OPEN III OPEN IV
1. Retrieve on Flat 1. Drop on Recall
2. Drop on Recall 2. Heel Free & Figure Eight
3. Retrieve over High Jump 3. Retrieve over High Jump
4. Broad Jump 4. Command Discrimination (Down, Stand, Sit)
5. Figure Eight & Heel Free 5. Broad Jump
6. Command Discrimination (Stand, Sit, Down) 6. Retrieve on Flat
7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Sit, Down) 7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Down, Sit)
   
OPEN V OPEN VI
1. Retrieve over High Jump 1. Command Discrimination (Down, Stand, Sit)
2. Drop on Recall 2. Broad Jump
3. Command Discrimination (Stand, Sit, Down) 3. Figure Eight & Heel Free
4. Figure Eight & Heel Free 4. Drop on Recall
5. Retrieve on Flat 5. Retrieve over High Jump
6. Broad Jump 6. Retrieve on Flat
7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Sit, Down) 7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Down, Sit)


Section 7. Command Discrimination. The principal features of this exercise are the dog’s correct response to the handler's commands and/or signals and that the dog stays until the handler returns to heel position.

     The orders are: “Leave your dog” and “Back to your dog.” The judge must use signals for directing the handler to command and/or signal the dog to change position except for the first position and that order is: “Stand your dog” or “Down your dog.”

     The handler will stand with the dog sitting in heel position in a place designated by the judge. The judge will ask “Are you ready?” before giving the first order to “Stand your dog” or “Down your dog.” The handler will give a command and/or signal for the dog to change position. On further order to “Leave your dog,” the handler may give a command and/or signal to stay and will immediately walk forward 15 feet, turn, and face the dog. On the judge’s signal, the handler will give a command and/or signal for the dog to change to the second position. The judge will then order “Leave your dog.” The handler may give a command and/or signal to stay and will immediately turn around and walk forward an additional 15 feet, turn, and face the dog. On the judge’s signal, the handler will give a command and/or signal for the dog to change to the third position. The judge will then order "Back to your dog." The handler may give a command and/or signal to stay, and then must return directly, walking around and in back of the dog to heel position. The dog must stay in position without additional commands or signals until the handler has returned to heel position.

 

Judging Procedure: This exercise must be performed on a long dimension of the ring. The 15 foot distances must be clearly marked. The judge must be positioned so that both the dog and handler are under continuous observation during the entire exercise. An excellent position for judging this exercise is at an adequate distance to the side and slightly to the rear of the dog.

 

Section 8. Command Discrimination, Scoring. A dog that fails to obey the handler’s first command and/or signal for each position or that does not stay until the handler returns to heel position must receive a non-qualifying (NQ) score.

     Substantial deductions will be made for a dog that changes position after the handler has returned to heel position and before the judge has said “Exercise finished.”

     Minor or substantial deductions, up to a non-qualifying (NQ) score, will be made for a dog that walks forward.

 

Section   9. Drop on Recall.

Section 10. Drop on Recall, Scoring.

Section 11. Retrieve on Flat.

Section 12. Retrieve on Flat, Scoring.

Section 13. Retrieve Over High Jump.

Section 14. Retrieve Over High Jump, Scoring.

Section 15. Broad Jump.

Section 16. Broad Jump Scoring.

Section 17. Stay – Get Your Leash. The principal feature of this exercise is that the dog remains in the sitting or down position, whichever is required at the time.

 

     The orders are: “Sit your dog,” “Down your dog,” “Leave your dog,” “Leave your dog to get your leash” and “Back to your dog.”

     For the first part of this exercise, the handler will stand with the dog sitting in heel position in a place designated by the judge. The judge will ask “Are you ready?” before giving the first order. On the judge’s order the handler will command and/or signal the dog to sit or down without touching the dog or the dog’s collar. On further order to “Leave your dog,” the handler may give a command and/or signal to stay and will walk forward immediately to a place designated by the judge, turn, and face the dog.

     After one minute from the time the judge ordered the handler to leave the dog, the judge will give the order “Back to your dog.” The handler must return directly, walking around and in back of the dog to heel position. The dog must not move from the required position until after the judge has said “Exercise finished.”
     Before starting the second part of this exercise the judge will ask “Are you ready?” On the judge’s order, the handler will command and/or signal the dog to sit or down without touching either the dog or the dog’s collar. On further order to “Leave your dog to get your leash,” the handler may give a command and/or signal to stay and will walk forward directly to the place outside the gate entrance designated by the judge for the leash. The handler will pick up the leash, re-enter the ring, stop at the gate entrance facing the dog, and wait for the judges’ order “Back to your dog.” The handler must return directly, walking around and in back of the dog to heel position. The dog must not move from the required position until after the judge has said “Exercise finished.” The judge will tell the handler “Attach your leash to the collar and maintain control of your dog.” The handler is required to exit the ring with the dog under control and without jumping, pulling or tugging on the leash.

 

Judging Procedures: Prior to the start of judging, the judge will decide where the leash will be placed, either on the judges’ table or tableside chair. The leash will be placed outside the ring by the steward after the dog and handler have entered the ring for judging. For both parts of this exercise, the handler must remain at least 30 feet away from the dog until ordered to return to the dog. When positioning dogs for the second part of this exercise, judges should ensure that such positioning will permit the dog to keep the handler in its direct line of vision as the handler leaves and returns to the ring. During this exercise the judge must be in position to watch the dog and see the handler leave and return to the ring. Once the exercise is finished, the judge must watch the dog and handler exit the ring together.

 

Section 18. Stay – Get Your Leash, Scoring. A non-qualifying score (NQ) is required for the following: The dog moving a substantial distance away from the place where it was left any time during either part of the exercise, not remaining in the required position until the handler has returned to heel position, and repeatedly barking or whining.

     Scoring of the exercise for such things as rough treatment of a dog by its handler or resistance by a dog to sit or down starts with the first order, “Sit (or Down) your dog.” These will be penalized substantially and in extreme cases the dog may be released.

     Substantial deductions will be made for a dog that moves even a short distance from where it was left, that barks or whines only once or twice, or that changes from the required position after the handler has returned to heel position and before the judge has said, “Exercise finished.” A substantial deduction, under Miscellaneous Penalties, must be made for a dog that does not remain under control while leaving the ring.

 

CHAPTER 11

PREFERRED NOVICE

ALTERNATIVE TITLING CLASS

Section 2. Preferred Novice Exercises and Scores. The exercises, maximum scores and order of judging:

1. Heel on Leash and Figure Eight   40 points

2. Stand for Examination                30 points

3. Heel Free                                   40 points

4. Recall                                        30 points

5. Stay – Sit or Down                     30 points

6. Sit Stay – Get Your Leash           30 points

Maximum Total Score                   200 points

The maximum judging rate is nine (9) dogs per hour.

 

Section 10. Sit Stay – Get Your Leash Performance and Scoring. This exercise will be performed and scored in the same manner as the Novice Sit Stay – Get Your Leash.

 

CHAPTER 12

PREFERRED OPEN

ALTERNATIVE TITLING CLASS

Section 1. Preferred Open Class. The Preferred Open class is an alternative titling class for dogs that have won the CD or PCD or higher Regular or Preferred titles. This is an additional class that may be offered by clubs at obedience events. The owner or any other person may handle dogs in this class. Owners may enter more than one dog in this class. Dogs entered in Preferred Open may also be entered in other obedience classes.

     Prior to the start of judging, the judge will decide where the leash will be placed and the order of exercises to be performed in that class. The placement of the leash and the order will not be disclosed to exhibitors until it is posted at the ring, approximately 45 minutes or earlier before the start of the class. In future assignments, judges are required to alternate the six orders of exercises so that each will be used approximately the same number of times.

     This class may be judged by anyone approved to judge Open obedience classes.
Section 2. Preferred Open Exercises and Scores. The various orders of exercises in the Preferred Open class (points and maximum scores are the same for all orders):

PREFERRED OPEN I

PREFERRED OPEN II

1. Heel Free and Figure Eight              40 points

1. Broad Jump

2. Command Discrimination                30 points

(Stand, Down, Sit)

2. Retrieve over High Jump

3. Drop on Recall                                30 points

3. Retrieve on Flat

4. Retrieve on Flat                              20 points

4. Drop on Recall

5. Retrieve over High Jump                30 points

5. Command Discrimination (Down, Sit, Stand)

6. Broad Jump                                    20 points

6. Figure Eight & Heel Free

7. Stay – Get Your Leash (Sit, Down)  30 points

7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Down, Sit)

Maximum Total Score                       200 points
The maximum judging rate is eight (8) dogs per hour.
 
   
PREFERRED OPEN III PREFERRED OPEN IV
1. Retrieve on Flat 1. Drop on Recall
2. Drop on Recall 2. Heel Free & Figure Eight
3. Retrieve over High Jump 3. Retrieve over High Jump
4. Broad Jump 4. Command Discrimination (Down, Stand, Sit)
5. Figure Eight & Heel Free 5. Broad Jump
6. Command Discrimination (Stand, Sit, Down) 6. Retrieve on Flat
7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Sit, Down) 7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Down, Sit)
   
PREFERRED OPEN V PREFERRED OPEN VI
1. Retrieve over High Jump 1. Command Discrimination (Down, Stand, Sit)
2. Drop on Recall 2. Broad Jump
3. Command Discrimination (Stand, Sit, Down) 3. Figure Eight & Heel Free
4. Figure Eight & Heel Free 4. Drop on Recall
5. Retrieve on Flat 5. Retrieve over High Jump
6. Broad Jump 6. Retrieve on Flat
7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Sit, Down) 7. Stay - Get Your Leash (Down, Sit)

 

Section 5. Command Discrimination Performance and Scoring. This exercise will be performed and scored in the same manner as the Open Command Discrimination.

 

Section 6. Drop on Recall Performance and Scoring.

 

Section 7. Retrieve on Flat Performance and Scoring.

 

Section 8. Retrieve over High Jump Performance and Scoring.

 

Section 9. Broad Jump Performance and Scoring.

 

Section 10. Stay – Get Your Leash Performance and Scoring. This exercise will be performed and scored in the same manner as the Open Stay – Get Your Leash.

 

CHAPTER 17

GRADUATE NOVICE

OPTIONAL TITLING CLASS

Section 1. Graduate Novice Class. The Graduate Novice class is an optional titling class for all dogs. This class may be offered by clubs at obedience events. The owner or any other person may handle dogs in this class. A person may enter more than one dog in this class.

     Prior to the start of judging, the judge will decide where the leash will be placed and post this information at the ring approximately 45 minutes or earlier before the start of the class.

     This class may be judged by anyone approved to judge Novice or higher classes.

 

Section 2. Graduate Novice Exercises and Scoring. The exercises and maximum scores in the Graduate Novice class:

1. Heel Free and Figure Eight            40 points

2. Drop on Recall                              40 points

3. Dumbbell Recall                            30 points

4. Dumbbell Recall over High Jump   30 points

5. Recall over Broad Jump                 30 points

6. Stay – Get Your Leash (Sit, Down) 30 points

Maximum Total Score                       200 points

The maximum judging rate is eight (8) dogs per hour.

 

Section 13. Stay – Get Your Leash Performance and Scoring. This exercise will be performed and scored in the same manner as the Open A class Stay – Get Your Leash.

 

CHAPTER 18

GRADUATE OPEN

OPTIONAL TITLING CLASS

Section 8. Go Out, Scoring. A dog will receive a non-qualifying (NQ) score if it: anticipates the handler’s command and/or signal to go out; fails to leave the handler; does not go out between the jumps; does not stop and remain at least 10 feet past the jumps without an additional command.

     Substantial deductions will be made for a dog that changes position after sitting or moves even a short distance after stopping.

     Minor or substantial deductions will be made for a dog that does not stop on command, that does not stop in the approximate center of the ring about 20 feet past the jumps, that does not sit, that receives an additional command to sit after the dog has stopped, or that anticipates the handler’s command to sit.

     Depending on the extent, minor or substantial deductions will be made for slowness in going out.

 

CHAPTER 19

VERSATILITY

OPTIONAL TITLING CLASS

Section 1. Versatility Class. The Versatility class is an optional titling class for all dogs. This class may be offered by clubs at obedience events. The owner or any other person may handle dogs in this class. A person may enter more than one dog in this class.

     Six exercises will be performed: two each from the Novice, Open and Utility classes. There will be no group exercise. The exercises will be performed and judged as in the regular classes. For the purpose of this class, scent discrimination articles 1 and 2 will be considered as a single Utility exercise.

 

CHAPTER 20

NON-REGULAR CLASSES

Section 7. Team Class. The Team class will be for teams of any four dogs that are eligible under these regulations. Five dogs may be entered, one to be considered an alternate for which no entry fee will be required.

     However, the same four dogs will perform all exercises. Dogs may be handled by the owner or any other person, need not be entered in another class at the same trial, and need not have obedience titles. A separate official entry form will be completed in full for each dog entered. No dog may be entered on more than one team.

     There will be two judges, one of whom will call orders while the other scores the team’s performance. The teams will be judged one at a time, except for the group exercise. Dogs must be spaced with a minimum of six (6) feet between each dog and a minimum of four (4) feet from the ring barriers. Judges will position the dogs in the approximate center of the ring in one row or back-to- back in two rows with a minimum of six (6) feet between the rows. If the back-to-back formation is used, it must be used for all groups in the class. On a 50’ side of the ring the maximum # of dogs allowed in a single row would be six (6) and in a back-to-back row twelve (12) dogs. (See table in Chapter 3, Section 14.)

 

     The dogs on a team will perform the exercises simultaneously and will be judged as specified for the Novice class, except that a Drop on Recall will be used in place of the Recall exercise. In all exercises except the Drop on Recall, the teams have the option of executing the judge’s orders on the team captain’s repeat of the command.

     In the Figure Eight portion of the Heel on Leash exercise, five stewards will be used. The stewards will stand 8 feet apart in a straight line. Each handler, with the dog sitting in heel position, will stand about equidistant from each of two stewards with all members of the team facing the same direction. On orders from the judge, the team will perform the Figure Eight, each handler starting around the steward on his/her left and circling only the two stewards between whom he/she had been standing.

     In the Drop on Recall exercise the handlers will leave their dogs simultaneously on order of the judge. The dogs will be called or signaled in, one at a time, on a separate order from the judge to each handler. Handlers will, without any additional order from the judge, command or signal their dogs to drop at a spot midway between the line of dogs and the handlers.

     Each dog will remain in the down position until all four have been called and dropped. The judge will give the order to call the dogs, which will be called or signaled simultaneously. The finish will be done in unison on order from the judge.

 

Section 8. Team Class, Scoring. Individual dogs’ scores will be based on the performance of the dogs and handlers individually plus team precision and coordination. Each dog and handler will be scored against the customary maximum for a team total of 800 available points. Individual dogs’ scores need not be recorded.

The exercises and maximum scores:

1. Heel on Leash and Figure Eight       160 points

2. Stand for Examination                    120 points

3. Heel Free                                       160 points

4. Drop on Recall                                120 points

5. Sit Stay – Get Your Leash               120 points

6. Group Exercise – Sit & Down Stay   120 points

Maximum Total Score                         800 points

 

GLOSSARY

Released – a dog will be released from performing the group exercise if it has non-qualified in the individual exercises. In the group exercise, in extreme cases, a dog that must be repositioned by its handler if it is out of position enough to interfere with an adjacent dog may be released. A dog must be released from the group exercise if it does not remain sitting during the first part. A dog may be released from competition in the class for misbehavior.

 

OBEDIENCE JUDGES’ GUIDELINES

CHAPTER 3

A judge’s comments, other than orders to the handler of a dog, shall be limited to a brief greeting, instructions on positioning the dog, and instructions covering the group exercise. A judge will never ask handlers about club affiliations, their opinions or about their dogs’ past performances.

 

OBEDIENCE JUDGES’ GUIDELINES

CHAPTER 4

Group Exercise. It is permissible for a judge to allow additional space on each side of a disabled handler to permit the handler to work the dog without touching it or without touching the dog on either side. All dogs, however, must be judged in judging program order.

 

PROCEDURES FOR JUDGES TO FOLLOW IN MARKING THE JUDGE’S BOOK

(Use Ballpoint Pen)

When a dog non-qualifies, and is “Released” write “NQ-R” (“Non- Qualifying Released”) then carry down an “NQ” in the “Total Score” box.

• Verify that the Group Exercise box has been marked accordingly, including a zero for no points off.

 

THE STEWARD IN OBEDIENCE

THE GATE STEWARD

NOVICE CLASS

The gate steward will line up the dogs and handlers outside the ring immediately prior to the judging of the Group Exercise – Sit & Down Stay. The judge should not be made to wait while the handlers are lined up. The Group Exercise is done in judging program order.

     The stewards must be ready to follow whatever instructions the judge may give.


 

Appendix B

Cesky Terrier Standard

 

General Appearance: The Cesky Terrier was developed to be a well-muscled, short legged and well-pigmented hunting terrier with natural drop ears and a natural tail. Correct coat and color are important. The Cesky is longer than it is tall and has a topline that rises slightly higher over the loin and rump. It sports a soft, silky coat in two color varieties, gray and coffee, the coffee color being extremely rare. The correct coat is clipped, not hand-stripped. The hallmarks of the breed should be unique unto itself with a lean body and graceful movement. They are reserved towards strangers, loyal to their owners, but ever keen and alert in their surroundings.

 

Size, Proportion Substance: Ideal Measurements - Height –The ideal Cesky should be 11˝ inches at the withers for dogs, 10˝ inches for bitches. Weight - ideally between 13 and 22 pounds, bitches weighing slightly less. Length -The length of the body, measured from sternum to buttocks should be in a ratio of approximately 1˝ (Length) to 1 (Height). The overall balance is more important than any single specification.

 

Head: About 7 to 8 inches long, 3 to 4 inches wide and shaped like a long, blunt wedge. The plane of the forehead forms a slight but definite stop. The breadth between the ears is slightly larger for a dog than a bitch. The head should join the neck smoothly. Eyes - Almond shaped of medium size. Slightly deep set. The color is brown or dark brown; the color being lighter in coffee-colored dogs. Ears - Medium size, dropping in such a way to well cover the orifice. Ears are set rather high, the fold not to protrude over the top of the skull, with forward edge lying close to the cheek. Shaped like a triangle, with the shorter side of the triangle at the fold of the ear, that is longer than wide.

Skull – Occipital protuberance easy to palpate, cheek bones moderately prominent. Frontal furrow only slightly marked. A shallow indentation running down the brows, and joining the muzzle with a moderate stop. Muzzle - Nasal Bridge straight. Narrow foreface undesirable. Stop not accentuated but apparent. Nose dark and well developed. The color is black in gray dogs, liver in coffee colored dogs. Teeth set square in a strong jaw, sound and regular, and of good size and full dentition. Either scissor or level bite is acceptable.

 

Neck, Topline and Body: Neck – Well muscled and strong. Medium-long, carried in a slight arch. Set firmly on the shoulders. Topline –A slight rise over the loin and rump. In profile, the highest point of the topline past the withers should be at the rump (not a roached back ) Body – Fully muscled, longer than high. Withers not very pronounced with the neck set rather high. Rump is strongly developed, muscular; pelvis moderately slanting with the hip bones, slightly higher than the withers. Flanks should be well fitted with an ample but slightly tucked up belly. The chest should be cylindrical with well sprung ribs. The loins should be relatively long, muscular, broad and slightly rounded. Tail – The ideal length is 7 to 8 inches, set following the line of the rump. Tail may be carried downward, or with a slight bend at tip; or carried saber shaped horizontally or higher. All of these tail carriages are considered correct with none having preference over the other. A tail carried over the back almost touching the back, a gay or squirrel tail, reflects an incorrect tail set and is incorrect for the breed.

 

Forequarters: The shoulders should be muscular, well laid back and powerful. The elbows should fit closely to the sides; somewhat loose, neither turned in nor out. The forelegs should be short, straight, well boned and parallel. Dewclaws may be present. Forefeet should be large, with well-arched toes, strong nails and well-developed pads.

 

Hindquarters: Hind legs should be strong, well-muscled with strong and well developed hocks that are well let down and parallel to each other. The hind feet should be smaller than the forefeet but have well arched toes, strong nails and be well padded. The thighs are longer in proportion to the lower leg with stifle well bent.

 

Coat- Furnishings long, fine but firm, slightly wavy with a silky gloss; not too much overdone. The Cesky Terrier is groomed with scissors or by clipping. At the forepart of the head the hair is not to be clipped, thus forming a fall and beard. On the lower parts of the legs, under the chest and belly the hair should not be clipped either. In show condition the hair at the upper side of the neck, on the shoulders and on the back should not be longer than ˝ inch; it should be shorter on the sides of the body and on the tail; and quite short on the ears, cheeks, at the lower side of the neck, on elbows, thighs and round the vent.

 

Color: All puppies are born black, or chocolate brown. In the mature dog, the correct color is any uniform shade of gray ranging from charcoal to platinum gray, or light coffee. Darker pigment may appear on the head, ears, feet and tail. White, brown and yellow markings are permitted on the beard, cheeks, neck, chest, limbs, and around the vent. A white collar or white tip on the tail is permitted. The base color must always be predominant. A brindled or reverse brindled coat is permitted in a dog up to 2 years of age. Disqualifications: White markings covering more than 20 percent of the body; white blaze on the head; brindled or reverse brindled coat in dog over age 2.

 

Gait: The action should be free and even, with good reach in both the front and back, covering the ground effortlessly. This is a working terrier, which must have agility, freedom of movement and endurance to work.

 

Temperament: Balanced, non-aggressive, pleasant and cheerful companion, easy to train; somewhat reserved towards strangers; of calm and kind disposition. Not to be sparred in the show ring.

 

Faults: Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault, and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree, and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

 

Disqualifications

A dog age 2 or older with a brindled or reverse brindled coat color.

White markings covering more than 20 percent of the body; white blaze on the head.

 

Resigned Judges: Mrs. Marion Lyons, Mr. Brian Phillips, Mrs. Susan Williamson

Emeritus Judges: Col. Jerry H. Weiss, Gail Brown, Kathleen Lund, Victoria Brown, Kathy Davidson

Deceased Judges: Mr. Henry G. Helmar, Mr. Nicholas A. Sasso, Robert Harris, Richard P. Mueller

1709 http://www.thedogpress.com/AKC/1710-Minutes.asp

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