Unaligned News For The Dog Fancy ~ Since 2002

 

 

AKC Board Minutes,Chairman's Report

AKC Board Meeting Minutes

American Kennel Club Board Motions, Actions as recorded by Secretary

 

Meeting held January 9th-10th, 2019 (AKC Published 1/14/2019)

The Board meets Jan, Feb, Apr, May, Jul, Aug, Oct, Nov - Delegates meet Mar, Jun, Sept and Dec.

 

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Wording is exactly as presented in the Minutes provided by American Kennel Club Secretary Gina M. DiNardo.

 

The Board convened on Monday, January 8, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. All Directors were present, except for Mr. Wooding. Mr. Wooding participated in the entire meeting by telephone conference, and by Board policy, and without objection, he did not vote. Also present was the Executive Secretary. The November 2018 Board minutes, copies of which had been provided to all Directors, were discussed. Upon a motion by Ms. Cruz, seconded by Dr. Davies, the November 2018 minutes were approved unanimously (Mr. Wooding not voting).

 

EXECUTIVE SESSION - There was an EXECUTIVE SESSION to discuss sensitive business matters. There was nothing reported out of this session.

 

PRESIDENT’S REPORT - Board Action Items - Mr. Sprung reviewed Action Items and reported on Staff initiatives.

 

Legal Status Report - The Board reviewed a status report on pending litigation and other Legal activities for the months of November and December 2018.

 

Lhasa Apso Proposed Breed Standard Revision - The Board reviewed additional proposed revisions to the Lhasa Apso Standard, submitted by the American Lhasa Apso Club (ALAC) as a result of the original proposed revisions having been published in the June 2018 Secretary’s Page. The current standard was approved February 9, 1991. Staff recommends the proposed revisions be published in the Secretary’s page of the AKC Gazette for comment. Following a motion by Mr. Powers, seconded by Dr. Davies, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent Mr. Wooding), to approve the proposed revisions for re-publication in the Secretary’s Page of the AKC Gazette for comment.Lhasa Apso Proposed Breed Standard Revision The Board reviewed additional proposed revisions to the Lhasa Apso Standard, submitted by the American Lhasa Apso Club (ALAC) as a result of the original proposed revisions having been published in the June 2018 Secretary’s Page. The current standard was approved February 9, 1991. Staff recommends the proposed revisions be published in the Secretary’s page of the AKC Gazette for comment. Following a motion by Mr. Powers, seconded by Dr. Davies, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent Mr. Wooding), to approve the proposed revisions for re-publication in the Secretary’s Page of the AKC Gazette for comment.

 

Parent Club Request to Retire Marcris (Maltese) - The Board reviewed a request from the American Maltese Association (AMA) to retire the kennel name “Marcris”. The name “Marcris” was registered from 1996-2016 as an All AKC Recognized Breed protected kennel name used by long time AMA member Ms. Joyce B. Watkins of Jupiter, FL (recently deceased).

 

Parent Club Request to Retire St. Aubrey & Elsdon (Pekingese) - The Board reviewed a request from the Pekingese Club of America (PCA) to retire the kennel names “St. Aubrey” and “Elsdon”. The kennel names St Aubrey and Elsdon were used by Nigel Aubrey Jones and Bill Taylor; both kennels significantly influenced the breed.

 

Parent Club Request to Retire Red Star (Black Russian Terriers) - The Board reviewed a request from the Black Russian Terrier Club of America to retire the name “Red Star” in the naming of Black Russian Terriers to preserve the integrity and historical significance of the famous kennel responsible for the development of the Black Russian Terrier.

     “Red Star” has not been used in naming Black Russian Terriers. The name is eligible for retirement. Following a motion by Ms. Cruz, seconded by Mr. Tatro, the Board VOTED (unanimously; absent Mr. Wooding), to approve the requests to retire the four kennel names presented: Marcris (Maltese), St. Aubrey (Pekingese), Elsdon (Pekingese) and Red Star (Black Russian Terriers).

 

Dock and Crop Following the November 2018 Board meeting, Staff was asked to review written materials on the practice of docking tails and/or cropping ears.

     Breeds that are currently docked or cropped base these procedures on historical function of the breed to prevent damage to the ears or tails as a result of engaging in activities that reflect the function of that breed.

     AKC requests that the AKC Canine Health Foundation provide grants for research on these and related topics from their donations.

 

MARKETING and MEDIA Kirsten Bahlke, Vice President, Consumer Demand provided an update from the Marketing Department. Business metrics were shared on the coverage of the AKC National Championship on AKC.org, and social media. Digital content and social media were used to drive organic consumer interest and engagement around the event; encourage live tune-in to AKC.TV and Animal Planet televised broadcast and expand our usage of and engagement on Instagram, as this is a critical platform for speaking with a younger audience.

     Updates on website traffic were provided – in December 2018 AKC.org hit a new all-time high in organic traffic with 1.6M visits, putting us at +35% over last year, while Marketplace is up +20% over last year.

 

COMPANION AND PERFORMANCE - Tracking – “Making Life Easier” Recommendations - The Board reviewed five recommendations from the Tracking Staff in the Sport & Events Department meant to address issues and questions that have been raised by the tracking community regarding participation in the sport. None of the recommendations change the substance of the test. They are in summary:

1. Allowing the Tracking Test secretary to enter the test – The recommended change allows the host club to decide if they will permit their tracking test secretary to enter the event.

2. Extending the Tracking Certification expiration date – The recommendation is to extend the expiration date to two years (24 months) to allow a handler a longer period of time to utilize the certificates before they expire; this would enable the certification to span more than one tracking season, and thereby not cause a hardship to participate.

3. Adding to the Pool of Tracking Certification Judges – The recommendation would be to allow any person that has put a TDX or VST title on a dog within the past ten (10) years to perform certifications. Thereby adding to the pool of evaluators eligible to certify dogs for TD/TDU tests, which will increase the number of dogs eligible to participate in the sport.

4. Allow Dogs with Physical Challenges to Participate in Tracking – The recommendation is to allow dogs with physical challenges (including amputees) to be eligible to participate in AKC tracking tests, provided, in the opinion of the judge, they display no signs of physical discomfort and can safely complete the test.

5. Clarifying the Combined Test limits – In Chapter 1, Section 17a of the Tracking Regulations addresses entry limits for combined tests, however it needs to be clarified. To clarify these combined test limits, staff proposes adding the following table to the end of Section 19:

Combined Tests Entry Limits (may be less):

Up to 2 TD/TDU with up to 5 TDX or 5 VST entries

Up to 4 TD/TDU with up to 4 TDX or 4 VST entries

Up to 6 TD/TDU with up to 3 TDX or 3 VST entries

Up to 8 TD/TDU with up to 2 TDX or 2 VST entries

Up to 10 TD/TDU with up to 1 TDX or 1 VST entry

TDX tracks combined with VST tracks are limited to 6 entries

 

Adding the information above does not change the limits of what a club may currently hold at their events, but rather clarifies the limitations. This will match the information found in the Tracking Test Manual and by adding it to the Regulations, it will help to clarify what is often misunderstood.

 

These recommendations were discussed with the Companion Events Delegates Committee at the December 2018 meeting. They voted in favor of all five recommendations, with a request to modify item #3 to allow any person that has put a TDX or VST title on a dog within the past ten (10) years to perform certifications, instead of the staff recommended five (5) years. Staff agrees with this change and has included it as the recommendation. This recommendation is a change to Regulations and may be made by a vote of the Board. If approved, this change would become effective April 1, 2019. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

Obedience Trial Champion Title Modifications - The Board reviewed a recommendation to modify the point schedule for earning the Obedience Trial Champion title. The recommendation is to make three modifications to the obedience program at the OTCH level:

     1. Open B Point Schedule: (1) Adjust the Number of Dogs Competing requirements, by decreasing the minimum number of dogs by one, for a range from 5-64 dogs. (2) Add one point to 2nd and 3rd place where it currently has zero points and add one point for 4th place for classes that have 20-29 dogs competing.

Open B Number of Dogs Competing 1st 2nd 3rd 4th
6-10 5-9 2 0 1 0 1 0
11-15 10-14 4 1 0 1 0
16-20 15-19 6 2 0 1 0
21-25 20-24 10 3 1 0 1
26-30 25-29 14 4 2 0 1
31-35 30-34 18 5 2 1
36-40 35-39 22 7 3 1
41-45 40-44 26 9 4 2
46-50 45-49 30 11 5 2
51-64 50-64 34 13 6  

     2. Earn One Point for Score of 195 or Better: A perfect score in obedience is 200. Add one (1) point for any dog that earns a qualifying score of 195 or better, when they do not earn points from the top four placements in the Open B and Utility B classes.

 

     3. OTCH#: Provide for an OTCH# title to provide recognition for exhibitors who have earned the OTCH title but want to continue with their dogs. We can do this by recognizing the number of times a dog has achieved the OTCH title requirement by adding a numeric designation to the title; e.g. OTCH2, OTCH3, etc. This is consistent with what AKC does in the other Companion Events sports of agility, rally and tracking as well as the additional title recognition levels in conformation.

 

It is the intent of the recommended changes to the OTCH title to encourage exhibitors to remain engaged in the sport of obedience. It is in the best interest of the sport to retain these long-time exhibitors. This recommendation is a change to Regulations and may be made by a vote of the Board. If approved, this change would become effective August 1, 2019. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

Retriever Field Trials – Exempt First Dog of A Series - The Board reviewed a recommended change to the Field Trial Rules and Standard Procedure for Retrievers. This recommendation would automatically exempt any dog selected as the first dog to run in a series who previously ran as the first dog in an earlier series of the same stake at the same trial. The dog having the next sequential entry number would replace the exempt dog as the first dog to run in the series. If approved by the Board, it will be read at the March Delegates’ meeting and voted on at the June Delegates’ meeting. If approved by the Delegate body, the effective date will be upon communication to the clubs. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

AKC Temperament Test - The Board reviewed a recommendation to implement an AKC Temperament Test open to all breeds and mixed breeds. While the Canine Good Citizen (CGC) test assesses trained behaviors related to the dog’s manners, the AKC Temperament Test will assess the dog’s reaction to stimuli in the world. These stimuli will be in the following five categories: social, auditory, visual, tactile (touch), and proprioceptive (motion). The ATT is a pass-fail test. A dog must pass ten testing items. From a list of 15 test items, ten will be selected (2 in each of the five categories) for each event. CGC Evaluators will be the judges for ATT tests. Dogs must be at least 1-year old to take the ATT test. Owners of dogs that pass the ATT test two times may apply for an ATT suffix title. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

AKC FIT DOG Clubs - The Board reviewed an update on the success of the AKC FIT DOG program and plans to expand the program by allowing clubs to become AKC FIT DOG clubs. Implemented as part of the AKC Family Dog program, many owners are excited about the AKC FIT DOG program.

     The program offers dog owners who reached a specified fitness goal a free car magnet featuring the AKC FIT DOG logo. Participation in AKC FIT DOG is bringing health benefits to both dogs and their owners. The Family Dog Department will implement the next step in the development of the AKC FIT DOG program, which is to encourage clubs to become AKC FIT DOG clubs.

     The criteria for becoming an AKC FIT DOG club are:

     1. The group will conduct: (a) at least 4 group fitness walks per year, or, (b) regularly scheduled canine fitness/conditioning classes.

     2. The group must complete a questionnaire describing their planned fitness activities, frequencies, etc. and submit it to the Family Dog Department.

     3. Groups that may apply to be AKC FIT DOG clubs include AKC clubs, independent dog training schools, and other dog related organizations.

     One could think of AKC FIT DOG clubs as a “meet-up” group centered on dogs and fitness.

     Groups that are approved as AKC FIT DOG clubs will receive a free banner with the AKC FIT DOG logo and their club name. It is anticipated the program will be announced around March 1, 2019.

     In addition to promoting health, the AKC FIT DOG club program will provide clubs a positive public outreach opportunity to engage new dog owners, share information about AKC activities and possibly attract new club members.

     There was no objection by the Board to the proposal to allow current AKC clubs to become eligible to offer AKC FIT DOG.

 

NADD Status Report - The Board reviewed a status report on AKC’s association with the North American Diving Dogs (NADD). In 2018, NADD provided dock diving at 46 different AKC clusters. If threshold levels of activity are reached, NADD shares revenue with the AKC clubs. Their National Championship held in Orlando adds an exciting dimension to that event. AKC has an exclusive contract with NADD. The NADD/AKC association has worked well and will continue into the foreseeable future.

 

CONFIRMATION: Using AKC Events and/or AKC Clubs or Special Attractions as a Qualifying Activity for an Event Held by a Third Party - The Board discussed a proposed new Policy to address situations where AKC Events, and/or Special Attractions are used as a qualifying activity for an event held by a third party. Clubs may not enter into agreements that may imply that their event, or a special attraction held in conjunction with their event, is part of a “series” of events or a “qualifying” activity for a larger event or competition held or sponsored by a third party without the written involvement of the AKC. The Board requested that staff make a few changes to the format of the policy proposed and bring the memo back for further review the following day of the Board meeting.

 

Entry Requirements Formatting Change – Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 11, Section 4 - The Board reviewed a recommendation from the Delegate Dog Show Rules Committee to change the formatting of the entry requirements listed in Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 11, Section 4.

     Chapter 11, Section 4 lists the items required for an entry to be acceptable. The proposal would change the order of a few items and clarify that the majority of the items are in reference to the dog. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

Grand Champion Points for Best of Breed – Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 16, Section 6 - The Board reviewed a recommendation from the Delegate Dog Show Rules Committee to change an italicized sentence in Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 16, Section 6 to be part of the rules.

      Chapter 16, Section 6 contains a sentence in italics that provides the Best of Breed winner to be awarded the GCH points calculated for Best of Breed or Best of Opposite Sex, whichever is greater. This has been part of the GCH calculations since 2010 but has not formally been incorporated into the rules. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 11 Italics Changes - The Board reviewed a recommendation from the Delegate Dog Show Rules Committee to change parts of the italics in Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 11, Sections 12 & 13 to become part of the rule. Additionally, the Dog Show Rules Committee is suggesting a few wording changes to these sections. These sections address the eligibility of superintendents, show secretaries, official veterinarians, and judges to exhibit.

     The proposed changes to Section 12 would only move the text from italics to become part of the rule. The change to Section 13 makes the rule gender neutral and would change the definition of immediate family (the Board approved similar changes at their October meeting which was after the DRSC September meeting but before the Committee submitted this request).

     Also included in the proposal is a wording change to the last paragraph of the italics (Board Policy) which the DSRC is requesting that the Board change and approve as they do not wish to move that paragraph from italics. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

Rewording Catalog & Judges Book Entry Errors Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 14, Section 8 - The Board reviewed a recommendation from the Delegate Dog Show Rules Committee to change the wording of Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 14, Section 8.

     Chapter 14, Section 8 details that errors in the catalog and judges book which are contrary to the information listed on the entry form may be corrected at the event. The proposal would reword the section. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

Stewards – Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 18 The Board reviewed a recommendation from the Delegate Dog Show Rules Committee(DSRC) to change the Board policy describing when an individual can steward under a judge. The DSRC wishes to extend the limitation outlined in Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 18 to include the remainder of the show cluster.

     Current Policy: In preparing the schedule of ring assignments, the chief steward and other club officials should keep in mind that no person should serve as steward with a judge under whom he has an entry, or under whom, in the course of the day’s judging, such entry may become eligible to compete. If it becomes necessary during the show to reshuffle stewarding assignments, care should be taken to see that a person is not assigned to serve as steward with a judge if there is any possibility that the judge, later in the show, will be passing upon an entry of the steward.

     The DSRC also recommends adding the word ‘conformation’ to the first sentence of Rules Applying to Dog Shows Chapter 18. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

Group Club Special Attractions at Multiple Shows in One Day - In October, the Board approved a number of changes to the Multiple Shows in One Day policy including restricting the number of special attractions with group competition to only one between the two shows. Since that time, a Group club has approached a Board Member to request that Group clubs be allowed to offer special attractions at both of their events as their special attraction judging is only for one group not all seven and Best in Show.

     Staff agrees that this is a reasonable request and recommends the Board approve the underlined addition to the policy:

     • No more than one special attraction with group competition may be offered between the two all-breed shows.

     The restriction on special attractions does not apply to group shows. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

Parent Club Membership Email Campaign Pilot - In the spring of 2018, AKC Club Development and AKC Marketing began collaborating with the German Shorthaired Pointer Club of America to conduct a membership drive through a series of emails.

     The program focused on three months’ worth of registrants. Each preceding month’s registrants would receive a series of emails, one each month for three months. The concept was to build a relationship between the new dog owner and the parent club. Club Development and the GSPCA worked closely together to develop the three custom emails. In addition to the email drive the GSPCA spent time making their website more appealing to visitors.

     The Club Development and Marketing departments are in the process of refining the program based on learnings from the initial pilot. Additional tests will be conducted to evaluate the changes.

 

Superintendent Billing Cycle - The Staff provided the Board with a memo to inform them of a change in the billing cycle for superintendents that takes effect January 1, 2019. Starting January 1, all superintendents will be invoiced weekly. This change has been included in the annual superintendent’s contract.

 

JUDGING OPERATIONS: Conformation Judging Statistics - The Judging Operations department provided the Board with statistics related to conformation judging applications considered by the Department in the preceding three months (October - December 2018) as well as the year-end summary statistics for 2018.

 

FINAL REVIEW ACTION SUMMARY 2018 YEAR-TO-DATE

  Number of Applicants Breed Requested Breeds Accepted Aps Limited Aps Fully Approved Aps Denied Aps Wthdrn Aps Held
NB 66 89 86 1 63 2 0 1
AB 293 1421 1366 13 272 8 0 1
Total 359 1510 1452 14 335 10 0 2

 

CLUBS: The Board reviewed a report on the prospective Delegate credentials to be published in two issues of the AKC Gazette, applications for AKC Membership, a report on Member Club Bylaws approved and newly licensed clubs.

     Report on Member Clubs Bylaws Approved in October and November 2018

Basenji Club of America (1957) - Conyers Kennel Club of Georgia, Rockdale County, GA (2004) - Irish Wolfhound Club of America (1926) - Kachina Kennel Club, Glendale, AZ (2006) - Mid-Hudson Kennel Association, Rhinebeck, NY (1950) - Norwegian Elkhound Association of America (1936) - Parson Russell Terrier Association of America (2003) - Upper Suncoast Dog Training Club, Clearwater, FL (1982)

     Report on Newly Licensed Clubs Approved in October and November 2018

     Calhoun Shetland Sheepdog Club of Louisiana, Calhoun, LA (including communities north to Arkansas state border, west to Route 167, east to Mississippi state border along Interstate 20), 23 total households, 15 local.
     Greater Chicago Scent Work Association, greater Chicago, IL (including communities north to Wheeling, south to Route 34, west to Route 59), 22 total households, 19 local.

     Nederlandse Kooikerhondje Club of the United States of America, 142 total households (42 households in 10 States west of the Mississippi River; 94 households in 20 States east of the Mississippi River; 6 households in Canada).

     Northern California Sporting Group Club, greater Rocklin, CA (including communities east of Interstate 80, north to Colfax, south to Livermore, no further west to Walnut Creek), 32 total households, 26 local.

     Scent Work Club of Central Wisconsin, greater Stevens Point, WI (including communities north to Wausau, south to Plover, along Interstate 39), 22 total households, 20 local.

     Versatile K9 Scent Work Club of Northern New Jersey, greater Morris Park, NJ (including all communities north of Interstate 78), 30 total households, 26 local.

 

English Setter Club of Medford - The English Setter Club of America was incorporated in 1906. The club is located in Medford, N.J. It is the oldest continuously operating field trial club in the United States. It preceded the English Setter Association of America, the AKC Parent Club, which became an AKC member club in 1931. The ESC of America hosted AKC’s 1st licensed Pointing Breed Field Trial in 1924 in Medford, NJ and resigned its AKC membership in May 1931.

     The Club submitted a request to again be licensed by AKC. They would like to be licensed as a multiple breed field trial and hunting test club (not a specialty club). The Board and Staff approve of this request, given the historic significance of this club; and the growing need to secure grounds for field events in the Northeast. Once eligible, the club would be licensed as a multiple breed Field Trial and Hunting Test club (not a specialty club). The club will also be informed that it is not eligible for member status. Club Relations will proceed with the sanctioning process using the name English Setter Club of Medford.

 

COMPLIANCE: Changes to the Regulations for Record Keeping and Identification of Dogs - Based on a request from the Board, Staff reviewed and recommended changes to the Regulations for Record Keeping and Identification of Dogs. The recommended changes would allow an alternative to the requirement that a printed copy of records be maintained as a backup to electronic records. This will be discussed further at the February Board meeting.

 

CONSENT - Following a motion by Dr. Battaglia, seconded by Dr. Davies it was VOTED (unanimously; absent Mr. Wooding); to approve the following Consent items:

     • Delegate Approvals

     • Barbet Eligibility to Compete in the Sporting Group

     • Boykin Spaniel Proposed Breed Standard Revisions

     • Change to Group Times at Concurrent All-Breed & Limited Breed Events

     • Dogo Argentino Eligibility to Compete in the Working Group

 

Barbet Eligibility to Compete in the Sporting Group - The Board VOTED to approve the Barbet for acceptance into the AKC Stud Book and for the Barbet to be eligible to compete in the Sporting Group effective January 1, 2020. The Breed Standard submitted by the Barbet Club of America was approved as the official standard for the breed. (Appendix A). The breed will be moved from the Foundation Stock Service into the Stud Book of the American Kennel Club on January 1, 2020. The Stud Book will remain open until January 1, 2025.

 

Boykin Spaniel Proposed Breed Standard Revisions - The Board VOTED to approve the proposed revisions to the Boykin Spaniel Breed Standard that were approved by the membership of the Boykin Spaniel Club & Breeders Association of America (BSCBAA). The breed standard will be effective on April 2, 2019. (Appendix B)

 

Change to Group Times at Concurrent All-Breed and Limited Breed Events - The Board VOTED to modify the Concurrent Group & All-Breed Events Board Policy to allow clubs to schedule the Group times as needed to run the event efficiently.

 

Concurrent Group & All-Breed Events (July 2017, Board meeting, amended January 2019) Group & All-Breed events may be held concurrently with the following limitations:

 

   1. Permission must be obtained from the all-breed club in order to apply.

   2. The events must be held on the same grounds (i.e., the same physical address).

   3. Ownership of the corresponding date must be agreed upon in writing and submitted with the event applications prior to event approval.

   4. The breed and group judging at either the all-breed or event or the breed judging in the group event may occur first but must be scheduled in order to avoid delays in group judging in the all-breed event. Group judging for the all-breed event must be held prior to the group judging in the group event. Group judging for the group event cannot conflict with BIS at the all-breed event.

   5. Evening or concurrent specialties are permitted for breeds that are not part of the group that is holding an event concurrently with the all-breed event.

   6. All-breed events must offer group and Best in Show competition. Group events must offer group competition.

   7. The use of multiple group rings is encouraged.

   8. Junior Showmanship competition is allowed.

   9. Obedience and Rally competitions are allowed, and encouraged, but must have their own ring(s) for competition.

 

Requests for multiple group events on the same day and site of an all-breed event will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

 

Dogo Argentino Eligibility to Compete in the Working Group - The Board VOTED to approve the Dogo Argentino for acceptance into the AKC Stud Book and for the Dogo Argentino to be eligible to compete in the Working Group effective January 1, 2020. The Breed Standard submitted by the Dogo Argentino Club of America was approved as the official standard for the breed. (Appendix C). The breed will be moved from the Foundation Stock Service into the Stud Book of the American Kennel Club on January 1, 2020. The Stud Book will remain open until January 1, 2025.

 

The Board adjourned at 3:20 p.m. The Board reconvened on Tuesday, January 9 at 9:10 a.m.

 

New Business: AKC Detection Dog Task Force - Dr. Battaglia, Mr. Sweetwood, Mr. Carota and Ms. Biddle gave an update on the AKC Detection Dog Task Force of which they are members. Great strides are being made in determining how AKC and AKC breeders can assist. The Task Force has a monthly call and the Board will continue to be updated on the progress being made.

 

Family Dog Magazine - There was a discussion of AKC publications. The Board felt that Family Dog Magazine was a quality publication that shares AKC, its Mission and Purebred dogs with the public in an entertaining and accessible manner.

     It was confirmed by staff that Family Dog Magazine is mailed on a complimentary basis to 51,000 Veterinary Waiting Rooms and Professional Dog Groomers. Total Circulation is over 270,000 per issue.

     Subscriptions are currently sold online via several school fundraiser and subscription agent sites. The Board asked Staff to look into further online distribution channels to increase its circulation and advertising revenue.

 

Using AKC Events or Special Attractions as a Qualifying Activity for an Event Held by a Third Party - Following a motion by Mr. Powers, seconded by Mr. Sweetwood, the Board VOTED (unanimously) to consider the matter at this meeting waiving its normal notice procedures. Following a motion by Ms. Biddle, seconded by Mrs. Wallin, the Board VOTED (unanimously) to approve the following policy:

 

     Using AKC Events and/or AKC Clubs or Special Attractions as a Qualifying Activity for an Event Held by a Third Party (January 2019)

     To ensure reasonable consistency across events and protect the best interests of the AKC and AKC Clubs, clubs considering an agreement with a third party regarding their events or special attraction held in conjunction with their events or clubs must seek the involvement and approval of the AKC when the following applies:

     • An AKC club or event is part of a “series” of events or a “qualifying” activity for a competition held or sponsored by a third party. Clubs considering this type of agreement must contact the AKC Executive Secretary.

     • A special attraction held in conjunction with an AKC club or event when the special attraction is a titling activity for a third party or part of a “series” or a “qualifying” activity for a competition held or sponsored by a third party. Clubs considering this type of agreement must contact the AKC Event Operations Department.

 

It is the club’s responsibility to understand if these conditions apply before entering into an agreement with a sponsor or special attraction provider.

 

It was VOTED to adjourn Tuesday, January 9, 2019 at 11:23 a.m.

 

Appendix A: The Barbet Breed Standard

GENERAL APPEARANCE An archetypic water dog of France, the Barbet is a rustic breed of medium size and balanced proportions which appears in works as early as the 16th century. In profile, the Barbet is slightly rectangular with a substantial head and long, sweeping tail. He has a long, dense covering of curly hair and a distinctive beard (French barbe), which gives the breed its name. An agile athlete, the Barbet has been used primarily to locate, flush, and retrieve birds. He has a cheerful disposition; very social and loyal.

SIZE PROPORTION, SUBSTANCE - SIZE Height at the withers: Dogs 21 to 24 inches, Bitches 19 to 22 inches. Weight in proportion to height. Proportions - Measured from point of shoulder to buttocks and withers to ground, the Barbet is slightly longer than tall. Exact proportion is not as important as balance. Substance - Neither coarse nor refined, the Barbet is solidly built with adequate bone to perform his tasks as a true sporting dog. Head: Of great importance, the head is strong, broad, and proportionally large. Expression is bright, engaging. Eyes of medium size, nearly round in shape, dark hazel to dark brown, harmonizing with the coat color. Eye rims are fully pigmented, corresponding to coat (black for black, black pied or gray dogs; brown for brown or brown pied dogs. Fawn dogs may have either black or brown pigmentation). Ears are wide and are set at eye level. Ear leather reaching at least to the corner of the mouth and fully covered with long hair. Skull is rounded and broad. Occiput is not prominent. Stop is defined, neither abrupt nor sloping. Head planes are nearly parallel. The muzzle is shorter than the skull and is quite square. Bridge of nose is broad. Lower jaw fairly square and strong. Jaws of equal length. The nose is large, with well opened nostrils, fully pigmented in harmony with coat color. Lips are thick, fully pigmented. Flews are tight. Scissors bite, teeth large and strong.

NECK, TOPLINE, BODY Neck is strong, blending well into the body. Back is solid with well sustained level topline, loin is short and slightly arched, croup rounded. The tail is the natural extension of the topline, long and low set. When in motion the tail is carried above horizontal in a sweeping curve but does not curl onto the back. The tail is never docked. Body is athletic with substance, chest is broad, well-developed, deep, reaching the elbow; ribs rounded but not barrel-like, underline slightly inclined without tuck-up.

FOREQUARTERS Emphasis is on balance. Shoulders are well laid back and approximately the same length as the upper arm, placing the front legs well under the chest with elbows close to the body. Legs are straight and strong; well boned. Pasterns are strong and flexible. Front dewclaws may be removed. Feet are round, and toes are tight, well-arched. Pads thick.

HINDQUARTERS Angulation balances with forequarters. Upper thigh is well muscled, stifle well bent, second thigh is well developed, hocks well let-down, short and perpendicular to ground; without dewclaws. Feet same as front.

COAT The coat of the Barbet is his defining characteristic. Profuse hair covers the whole body evenly with thick, natural curls that range from large and loose to tight, smaller curls. The hair on the top of the head reaches the bridge of the nose. He has a distinctive beard. Ears are covered in long hair. The coat is shown in as natural a state as possible; clean and free from mats. The hair is to retain curl. While scissoring is necessary to keep him neat, excessive sculpting and shaping is to be penalized.

COLOR All shades of black, gray, brown, fawn; with or without white markings. Pied (primarily white with all shades of black, gray, brown, fawn markings).

GAIT Easy, ground-covering trot with good front reach and impulsion from hindquarters with precise cadence. Feet converge toward the centerline with increased speed. Topline remains level and carriage is smart.

TEMPERAMENT The Barbet is a responsive, loving member of the family. Joyful, bright, and kindly natured, he is a versatile sporting dog and willing participant in many activities. The sensitive Barbet responds to positive interaction and training and displays an even temperament.

Approved December 9, 2015 - Effective January 1, 2017

 

Appendix B: The Boykin Spaniel Breed Standard

GENERAL APPEARANCE The Boykin Spaniel was developed in South Carolina, USA as a medium-sized sporting dog with a docked tail. The breed is built to cover all types of ground conditions with agility and reasonable speed. Size and weight were essential in development of the breed as these hunting companions needed to be lighter and smaller than their larger sporting dog cousins to fit in the portable section boats of the time period. As a result, the Boykin Spaniel came to be known as “the little brown dog that doesn’t rock the boat”. Being a hunting dog, he should be exhibited in hard muscled working condition. His coat should not be so excessive as to hinder his work as an active flushing spaniel but should be thick enough to protect him from heavy cover and weather. The Boykin Spaniel is primarily a working gun dog; structure and soundness are of great importance.

SIZE, PROPORTION, SUBSTANCE The Boykin Spaniel is solidly built, with moderate bone, and smooth firm muscles. The ideal height measured from the ground to the highest point of the shoulder blades for dogs is 15 to 18 inches at the withers; for bitches is 14 to 16 inches at the withers. Any variance greater than 1 inch above or below the ideal height is a major fault. The minimum height ranges shall not apply to dogs or bitches under 12 months of age. Proportion is slightly longer than tall, never square. However, exact proportion is not as important as the dog being well-balanced and sound, capable of performing the breed’s intended function.

HEAD The head must be in proportion with the size of the dog. The expression is alert, eager, self-confident, attractive and intelligent. Eyes range from yellow to amber to varying shades of brown, set well apart, medium size and almond or oval shaped, and trusting. Protruding or bulging eyes is a major fault. Ears are pendulous and set slightly above or even with the line of the eye; ear set is higher when alert. The leather of the ear is thin and when pulled forward should almost reach the tip of the nose. The ears hang close to the cheeks and are flat. Skull is fairly broad, flat on top, and slightly rounded at the sides and back. The occiput bone is inconspicuous. The stop is moderate. When viewed from the side the nasal bone and the top of the skull form two parallel lines. Muzzle is approximately the same length as the skull, and is approximately the width of the skull. The distance from the tip of the nose to the occiput is about the same length as occiput to the base of the neck. The nasal bone is straight with no inclination down or of snippiness. The nose is to be fully pigmented, dark liver in color with well opened nostrils. The lips are close fitting and clean, without excess skin or flews. Scissors is the preferred bite, level is acceptable. Pronounced or extreme overshot or undershot bites are major faults. Broken teeth should not count against the dog.

NECK, TOPLINE, BODY Neck is moderately long, muscular, slightly arched at the crest and gradually blends into sloping shoulders and never concave or ewe-necked. Back - The topline is straight, strong and essentially level and should remain solid and level in movement. Loins are short, strong with a slight tuck up. His body is sturdily constructed but not too compact and never square. The shoulders are sloping. The brisket is well developed but not barreled, extending to the elbow and not too broad or narrow as to interfere with movement. A ⅔ to ⅓ ribs to loin ratio is preferred. The croup slopes gently to the set of the tail, and the tail-set follows the natural line of the croup. The tail is docked to a length of 3 to 5 inches when fully mature. The tail’s carriage should be carried horizontally or slightly elevated and displays a characteristic lively, merry action, particularly when the dog is on game.

FOREQUARTERS The Boykin Spaniel’s shoulders are sloping, clean and muscular. His legs medium in length, straight and well boned but not too short as to handicap for field work or so heavy as to appear clumsy. Pasterns are strong with no suggestion of weakness. Feet are round, compact, well-arched, of medium size with thick pads. Dewclaws should be removed. The toes closely grouped, webbed and well padded.

HINDQUARTERS The Boykin Spaniel has well developed hips and thighs with moderate angulation at the stifle with the whole rear assembly showing strength and drive. Hindquarters are muscular and most importantly, in balance with the forequarters. Hocks well let down, pasterns relatively short, strong and parallel when viewed from the rear. Feet – see feet under forequarters.

COAT The coat can range from flat to slightly wavy to curly, with medium length. The Boykin Spaniel is typically a single coat breed but may have undercoat. Boykin Spaniels are considered a “wash and wear” dog easily going from the field to the ring. The ears, chest, legs and belly are equipped with light fringe or feathering. His coat may be trimmed, never shaved, to have a well-groomed appearance and to enhance the dog's natural lines. It is legitimate to trim about the head, throat, ears, tail and feet to give a smart, functional but natural appearance. Honorable field scars are acceptable.

COLOR The Boykin Spaniel color is a solid liver color - a deep reddish-brown color that includes various shades of chocolate brown, from light to very dark. A small amount of white on the chest is permitted and no other white markings are allowed. Sun bleaching is acceptable.

GAIT Movement is effortless with good reach from well laidback shoulders at an angle that permits a long stride that is in balance with the rear quarters for strong driving power with no wasted movement. Viewed from the rear the hocks should drive well under the body following on a line with the forelegs neither too widely nor closely spaced. As speed increases it is natural for the legs to fall to a center line of travel. Seen from the side it should exhibit a good, long forward stride with no side winding. In gait the tail is carried level to or above the back.

TEMPERAMENT The Boykin Spaniel is friendly, a willing worker, intelligent and easy to train. The Boykin Spaniel thrives on human companionship and gets along well with other dogs and children. He shows great eagerness and energy for the hunt yet controllable in the field.

FAULTS The foregoing description is that of the ideal Boykin Spaniel. Any deviation from the above described dog must be penalized to the extent of the deviation.

Approved January 7, 2019 - Effective April 2, 2019

 

Appendix C - The Dogo Argentino Breed Standard

GENERAL APPEARANCE The ideal Dogo Argentino is a study in harmony. He is large, powerful, and athletic. His strong head is supported by a thick, but elegant neck that connects to a balanced body, which is sustained by straight, substantial forelegs and very muscular, medium-angulated hindquarters. The Dogo gives the impression of explosive power and energy. Developed to find, chase and catch dangerous game the Dogo must have a good nose, great lung capacity, and a powerful, yet agile, muscular build. His expression is alert and intelligent, with a marked hardness. The Dogo is instantly identifiable by his short, completely white coat.

     The Dogo Argentino's head gives him his unique stamp. The measurement from the brow bone to the tip of the nose is the same length as the measurement from the brow bone to the occiput. These proportions were designed to give the Dogo a sufficiently large mouth and powerful bite for holding prey. Great value is placed upon this equal lengths ratio of 1:1 and a large mouth.

     The general appearance and overall balance of the Dogo Argentino, with utmost consideration given to type is a first priority. Special attention is then devoted to the head; followed by individual body components for correctness, and the gait thoroughly evaluated for efficiency.

SIZE PROPORTION, SUBSTANCE - SIZE Height and weight - Males: 24 to 26 inches, Bitches: 24 to 25 inches. Ideal height: Males: 25 to 25 inches, Females: 24 to 25 inches. Height above or below the limits established in the standard is a disqualification. Approximate Weights: Males: 88 to 100 pounds, Bitches: 88 to 95 pounds. Proportion - The measurement from the brow bone to the tip of the muzzle is the same length as the measurement from the brow bone to the occiput. The withers are slightly higher than the croup. The depth of the chest represents at least 50 percent of the height at the withers. The body is slightly off square; The length of the body (measured from the point of the shoulder to the point of the buttock) may exceed the height at the withers by no more than 10 percent. Substance - Substantially-boned and muscular, with a large and powerful head. Females are slightly smaller than males and look feminine, but without weakening substance or structure. Lack of bone and muscle development is to be severely penalized.

HEAD Head - Powerful and balanced. The ratio of cranial length is equal to cranial width. The length from the brow bone to the tip of the nose is the same length as the distance from the brow bone to the occiput. Skull - Solid and convex, both length and widthwise, due to the relief created by the insertion of the powerful biting and nape muscles. The occiput is covered by the nape. The cheeks and masseter muscles are large, well defined, and covered with tight skin. The stop is slightly defined, as a transition from the convex skull to the slightly concave foreface. When viewed in profile, the stop appears more defined due to the prominence of the supraorbital ridges (brow). Expression - Alert and intelligent, with a marked hardness. Eyes - Medium size, almond shaped, dark or hazelnut in color, protected by thick eyelids with black or flesh-colored rims (black preferred). Sub-frontal position, set wide apart. Blue eye(s) or any blue in the eyes is a disqualification. Ears - Set at the highest points of the sides of the skull. Customarily, the ears are cropped, erect or semi-erect, and triangular in shape. Length does not exceed 50 percent of the front edge of the auricle of the ear. Without being cropped, they are of medium length, broad, thick, flat and rounded at the tip. Covered with smooth hair which is slightly shorter than on the rest of the body; they can have small dark spots, not to be penalized. In uncropped position they hang down covering the back of the cheeks. When the dog is alert they may be carried semi-erect. Muzzle and Nose - The muzzle is strong, a bit longer than deep, well developed in width, with the sides slightly converging. The top of the muzzle is slightly concave when viewed in profile. The nose is completely black and has large nostrils. Noses that are only partially pigmented in adult specimens are to be severely penalized. Noses other than black are a disqualification. Bite and Jaw Structure - The jaw bones are well-developed, strong, and fit together correctly, not being over or undershot. The power of the Dogo’s bite comes from the angulation on the bottom jaw. Scissor bite is preferred, but pincer bite is acceptable. Full dentition is recommended. Teeth should be healthy and large. Broken teeth are not to be penalized on hunting dogs. Overshot or undershot dogs are to be disqualified. Lips - The lips are very tight fitting (black pigment is preferred); never pendulous. Very short lips are preferred so that when the dog is holding prey in his mouth, he can still breathe through the commisure at the back corner of his mouth. Disqualification - The top lip extending below the bottom jaw.

NECK, TOPLINE, BODY Neck - Thick, strong, and arched, yet elegant. The skin is very thick and wrinkled, without forming excessive dewlap. The elasticity of the skin is due to the cellular tissue being very lax. Back and Topline - The withers are pronounced. The back is strong, with well-defined muscles. The muscular topline is highest at the withers and slopes slightly to the croup. A longitudinal groove, created by the relief of the dorsal muscles, runs along the dog's spine. Seen from the side the topline should not have any depression. Body - Slightly off square. The length of the body (measured from the point of the shoulder to point of the buttock) may exceed the height at the withers by 10 percent. The chest is broad and deep, giving the impression of large lungs. The thorax is deep, and when viewed from the front and in profile it extends below the elbows. The loins are short and muscular. The underline is well muscled, with only a slight to moderate tuck-up of the abdomen. The croup is muscular and broad. The tail is medium set, appearing as a continuation of the spine. It is thick at the base, straight and tapers like a saber to the hock joint. At rest it hangs down naturally, in action or when trotting it is raised approximately 45 degrees to the topline and is amply curved in an arc. Curled tails are to be penalized. The hair on the tail is short.

FOREQUARTERS Legs are straight, and vertical. Shoulders are laid back, with great muscular development, yet are not exaggerated. The upper arm is the same length as the shoulder; well inclined. Elbows are placed naturally against the chest wall.

HINDQUARTERS Broad, with very muscular thighs and short rear pasterns (Moderate angulation in balance with the forequarters.) Strong hocks, perpendicular to the ground, neither turned in or out. Rear feet similar to front feet but slightly smaller. Without dewclaws.

COAT Uniform, straight, short, and smooth, with an average length of to inches. Long hair is a disqualification.

COLOR Entirely white. The only tolerable spots are one black or dark-colored patch on the skull but which can also be located on one ear or around one eye or very small dark spots on the ears. The size of the spot must be in proportion to the size of the head, not exceeding 10 percent of the latter. More than one spot on the head (with the exception of small spots on the ears) is a disqualification. Comparing two dogs of equal quality, the whiter is preferred. The rims, nose and lips are preferably pigmented in black. Black pigmented skin anywhere on the dog is acceptable. A black spot anywhere other than on the head is a disqualification.

GAIT Agile and firm with noticeable modification when showing interest in something, changing into an attitude of alertness and responding with quick reflexes. Viewed from the side, proper front and rear angulation is manifested in a smoothly efficient, level-backed, ground covering stride with a powerful drive emanating from the rear. Viewed from the front or rear, the legs are parallel but converge towards the centerline as speed increases. The Dogo’s gait should always appear harmonious and balanced, showcasing his solid and sound body construction.

CHARACTER & TEMPERAMENT The Dogo is a strong, tenacious and rustic dog that was created to protect family and property, as well as to hunt large game and destructive predators. He is a faithful companion at home and in the field. Of all of the Dogo’s attributes, he is above all else, courageous.

DISQUALIFICATIONS Height above or below the limits established in the standard. Blue eye(s). Any blue color in the eye(s). Nose any color other than black. Overshot or undershot mouth. Top lip extending below the bottom jaw. Long hair. More than one spot on the head (with the exception of small spots on the ears). Spots on the hair of the body.

Approved November 12, 2018 - Effective January 1, 2020

 

Emeritus Judge: Ada M. McClory (OR)

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