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CANINES COMFORT WAR-TORN UKRAINE

 

The photos say it all, desperate people fleeing for their lives but clutching their little dogs as their most precious possession and comfort.

 

March 14, 2022

NetPlaces Network Staff

 

Pets are proven to significantly help owners recover from disasters and wars, when they are not seperated...

 

 

A compelling study by ‘Frontiers in Veterinary Science’ on the impact of pets on PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) after an earthquake found the stress levels of pet-owners were ‘higher than those of non-pet owners immediately after disaster’. Of course they were! That was because they were seperated from their pets which are so important in human psychological recovery.

 

Sadly, as recently as 2020 there were ‘dangerous breed’ laws and mandatory pet sterilization orders in many Ukrainian cities including the Ukraine capitol city of Kyiv. The Ukrainian list of over 80 “dangerous dogs” included people-loving, patient breeds such as Bulldogs, Boxers, the ever-faithful Labrador Retriever and the little Welsh Terrier.

 

Ironically, the sterilization list also included essential, valuable livestock guardian breeds. In the 1960s Ukraine had nearly 10,000 sheep but by 2019 they were down to less than a thousand. Most of the Ukraine’s sheep dogs originated in Russia but as in every country, dogs are used for psychological comfort.

 

 

Ukrainian dog owners were required to pay very high license fees, provide proof of insurance, keep their dogs on a short leash and wear a muzzle when in public places. Some of the breeds most affected in the Ukraine included the Akbash, American Pit Bull Terrier, Presa Canario, Kangal Shepherd Dog, and both the Greek Shepherd and Romanian Shepherd.

 

As of 2022 there are no national breed specific legislation or restrictions in Ukraine. It is up to each municipality to establish local regulations and restrictions. In the Ukraine capital, Kyiv, as per law adapted at 1998, breeds forbidden for breeding and requiring mandatory sterilization includes Akbash, APBT, Presa Canario, Kangal, Romanian Shepherd, Greek Shepherd, Alek Roshhin Doberman, Superdog and Superdog Mainkong mixes and nationally unrecognized breeds.

 

In some areas, the law requires mandatory spay, muzzles, insurance, short leash, and/or very high license fees.

 

TheDogPress.com is told that the Ukrainian Kennel Club (KSU) still considers “dangerous” breeds such as the American Bulldog, American Staffordshire Terrier, English Mastiff, Dogo Argentino and Dogue De Bordeaux.

 

 

The Ukrainian people love their brethren, their traditions and their dogs. Our hearts go out to them but more tangible, America is sending food, clothing and medical help. Do what you can to help while trying to ignore the politics that foster such inhumane human actions.

TheDogPress.com EST 2002 © Mar 2022 https://www.thedogpress.com/Columns/canines-comfort-war-torn-Ukraine-s22FF033.asp

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